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SHI participating in First Friday
Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Sealaska Heritage Store will have featured artists at the Walter Soboleff Building for First Friday and the dance group Yees Ku Oo will perform in Shuka Hit (the clan house). The institute is offering free admission to the exhibit, Enter the World of the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian Peoples, and Shuka Hit from 4:30-8:00 pm. SHI also will be doing drawings to give away limited-edition t-shirts from the grand opening of the building. (Flyer)

Lecture shares stories in cedar
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A graduate student visiting Southeast Alaska from the University of Kent will share his work studying names in the region that incorporate Native words for cedar. The lecture takes place at noon today in the Walter Soboleff Building. In a research proposal explained by Sealaska Heritage Institute, Felipe Vasquez argues that traditional ecological knowledge could help humans adapt to climate change...(more)

SHI lecture will share story of returned headdress
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage will present a free lecture from a French anthropologist and visiting scholar at noon Wednesday in the Walter Soboleff Building. The lecture by Marie Mauzé, Ph.D., will tell the story of how a British Columbia headdress belonging to the Kwakwak’awakw was repatriated in 2003...(more)

SHI seeking investigation of Native art sale
Collection contains several items from Southeast tribes
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl has called for a federal investigation into the sale of a collection of Native American art, including several pieces from Southeast Alaska tribes. Worl heard about two weeks ago of the sale of a collection of art owned by the Andover Newton Theological School, including about 125 pieces of Native American art representing 52 tribes, some of which are known to be of Tlingit and Haida origin. Dan Monroe, president and CEO of the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and a colleague of Worl’s, notified SHI and other tribal organizations of the sale...(more)

SHI petitions feds to investigate sale of Native objects by east coast school
Sealaska Heritage Institute is asking the federal government to investigate whether the planned sale of a Native American art collection by a Massachusetts school is legal under repatriation laws. The Andover Newton Theological School (ANTS) is moving to sell the collection, which contains 1,100 objects, including 125 works of Native American art representing fifty-two tribes in the United States and Canada that have been accessible to the public through the Peabody Essex Museum.  The sale may run afoul of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAPGRA) because the school receives and/or processes federal student aid funds, wrote SHI President Rosita Worl in a letter sent on June 22 to David Tarler, a program officer in NAGPRA’S Training, Civil Enforcement and Regulations Division...(more)

SHI to sponsor lecture on Native place names that feature cedar
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor a free lecture by a visiting scholar on Native place names in Southeast Alaska, particularly those that incorporate Native words for yellow and red cedar. The lecture by Felipe Vasquez, a graduate student at the University of Kent, is based on his ethnobotanical study of toponyms--place names derived from topographical features in the region. In his research proposal, Vasquez argues that traditional ecological knowledge is seen as both cultural heritage to be treasured and practical site-specific knowledge that could help humans adapt to climate change. “How much can the names we give our landscape tell us about a culture?” Vasquez wrote...(more)

Photo: Formline workshop
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Lance Twitchell conducts a formline design workshop at the Living History Center in the Walter Soboleff Building on Tuesday, June 16. The free workshop was organized through Sealaska Heritage Institute's Jinéit Art Academy as part of a series of regional programs designed to help artists at all levels learn and enhance their formline, a term that describes the complex designs that make up the underlying components of Northwest Coast art. The workshops, offered in 10 communities throughout the month of June, are also designed to increase the number of Native artists and art instructors qualified to teach Northwest Coast art in public schools...(more)

Hoonah student chosen for Judson Brown Scholarship
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute has chosen a Hoonah student as the 2015 recipient of the Judson L. Brown Leadership Award. The recipient, Amelia “Tlaagoonk” Wilson, is a Chookaneidi (Eagle/Bear), Kaach.adi Yadi (Child of the Raven/Land Otter). She is pursuing a master’s degree in rural development at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Rural and Community Development. The $5,000 scholarship goes to students who have demonstrated academic achievement and leadership skills, said SHI President Rosita Worl, adding only one person wins the annual award. “Amelia has shown remarkable leadership skills through multiple programs, including as a representative on the Hoonah City Council. We are very proud to honor her with this award”...(more)

SHI to sponsor lecture on repatriation of headdress by visiting scholar
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor a free lecture by a French anthropologist and visiting scholar on the repatriation of a British Columbia headdress in 2003. The lecture by Marie Mauze, Ph.D., will focus on a Kwakwak’awakw headdress that was acquired in 1965 by French poet Andree Breton and repatriated to the U’Mista Culture Centre (Alert Bay). Mauze, an anthropologist with the College de France, was instrumental in its return. The lecture, titled “The Lives of a Kwakwak’awakw Headdress from its Confiscation by the Canadian Authorities in 1922 until its Repatriation in 2003,” is scheduled at noon, July 1, in SHI’s Living History Center in the Walter Soboleff Building. Attendees are invited to bring their own lunch to the lecture, which will also be videotaped and posted online....(more) (Flyer)

Touching the past through running
Native youth camp adds a deeper insight into culture
By Klas Stolpe
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Glancing sideways, her arms pulling strongly forward and back in opposite motions to her legs, Dzantik’I Heeni sixth-grader Ellysiem Paine smiled as runners passed her on an Eaglecrest uphill sprint. “I like joining running but sometimes I am a little slow,” Paine said. “I just try to push myself so I can be faster. Sometimes I am behind and the coaches help me push myself.” Paine was taking part in last week’s Sealaska Heritage Latseen Running Camp...(more)

SHI to sponsor Baby Raven Reads family event
Reserve your spot now to participate in our next Baby Raven Reads family event, scheduled Sunday, July 12. Alaska Native families with children ages birth to 5 are invited to join us for storytelling, songs and other cultural and literacy activities. We’ll have two sessions that day: Session 1 is scheduled from 10am-12pm and session 2 is scheduled from 12pm-2pm at Gajaa Hit in Indian Village in Juneau (250 Village Street--the building next to the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall (formerly known as ANB Hall) ). To reserve your spot, contact LaVina at 586-9125, or lavina.vansickle@sealaska.com or Jackie at jackie.kookesh@sealaska.com or 586-9229. This free event is part of SHI's Baby Raven Reads program, which promotes pre-literacy, language development and school readiness. (Flyer)

Sealaska Heritage to hold cultural performing arts intensive
SHI is recruiting students for a Cultural Performing Arts Intensive through its Voices on the Land program in Juneau. The project taps traditional and performing arts to increase literacy skills and student engagement. Native students in 4-5 grades and middle schools will be working to improve storytelling skills with actors James Sullivan, Frank Katasse and Katrina Hotch. Students will practice Tlingit language, play theatre games and work with a cultural specialist. There will be parent and student workshops are provided on several evenings during the intensive. The intensive for 4-5 grade students will be June 29-July 2. The middle school intensive will be July 6-July 11. We’ll have an “All Student Showcase” on July 11 in Shuká Hít (the clan house) at the Walter Soboleff Building. Register: http://goo.gl/forms/RcPAaCUlnN. Registration will be open till the first 20 students are registered or until June 26. For any questions please contact katrina.hotch@sealaska.com (Flyer)

Deadline for Latseen Leadership Academy extended
Institute accepting applications through June 19
Sealaska Heritage has extended the application deadline for its annual Latseen Leadership Academy program to June 19. This year's academy for high school students will be held July 6-19 at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau. The academy will serve 40 high school students from Angoon, Prince of Wales, Klukwan and Juneau. Travel scholarships are available. The academy is designed to provide engaging culturally-based education and activities for high school students in support of their future academic and personal success with a focus on rigor, relevance, and relationships...(more) (Flyer) (Application)

SHI sponsoring camp for little gumboots
Sealaska Heritage is accepting applications for Gumboot Camp, a culturally responsible kindergarten readiness program for Alaska Native children. The camp is for shaaw (gumboots) entering kindergarten and shaawk’ (little gumboots), age 4. The camp is scheduled 1-4pm, August 10-14 in Juneau. Applications are due July 10. The may be mailed, emailed or faxed to LaVina VanSickle at 105 S. Seward St., Suite 201, Juneau, AK 99801; lavina.vansickle@sealaska.com; 907.586.9293. (Application for Age 4) (Application for Age 5) (Flyer)

Hoonah student chosen for Judson Brown scholarship
Sealaska Heritage Institute has chosen a Hoonah student as the 2015 recipient of the Judson L. Brown Leadership Award. The recipient, Amelia "Tlaagoonk" Wilson, is a Chookaneidi (Eagle/Bear), Kaach.adi Yadi (Child of the Raven/Land Otter). She is pursuing a master’s degree in rural development at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Rural and Community Development. The $5,000 scholarship goes to students who have demonstrated academic achievement and leadership skills, said SHI President Rosita Worl, adding only one person wins the annual award. "Amelia has shown remarkable leadership skills through multiple programs, including as a representative on the Hoonah City Council. We are very proud to honor her with this award," said Worl, noting Amelia also carries a 3.8 grade point average...(more)

SHI goes local in effort to enhance Northwest Coast art
By Emily Files
KHNS
Sealaska Heritage Institute is working to strengthen Northwest Coast art in Southeast Alaska. Right now, SHI representatives are touring ten communities to gather ideas from local people about enhancing Native arts. That's happening in conjunction with an initiative that sponsors formline design classes in Southeast. Tlingit master carver Wayne Price was the teacher for a SHI-sponsored formline class in Haines last week. He taught about a dozen locals in the traditional artwork of Northwest Coast Natives. Formline design is the distinguishing feature of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artwork. It describes the curving lines that create shapes you see in carvings, weavings, and drawings. Price told his students about the first time he saw carvers using formline design. "I didn't have a clue what it meant but I knew I really liked it," he said. "It wasn't too long for me to figure out it was going to be the destiny of my life. 45 years later I have had not one day of regret"...(more)

Sealaska Heritage to sponsor running camp
Sealaska Heritage is piloting its new Latseen Running Camp for Native middle and high school athletes in Juneau. The camp will run from 10am-2pm, June 10-13. Camp activities consist of trail runs, track workouts, and cross training. The camp will focus on goal setting, creating a training calendar, and injury prevention/strength training. Running is a great way to increase Haa Latseen—strength of body, mind and spirit—one of our core cultural values. Register: https://goo.gl/HFiJf9 (Flyer)

SHI to sponsor family event for Baby Raven Reads 
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a family event for Alaska Native families with children ages 0-5. This free event is part of SHI's Baby Raven Reads program, which promotes pre-literacy, language development and school readiness. Families are invited to join SHI for storytelling, songs and other cultural activities. We will feature drumming by Mary Folletti. The event will be held from 12:30pm-2:00pm, Sunday, June 7 at Gajaa Hit in Indian Village in Juneau (250 Village Street--the building next to the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall (formerly known as ANB Hall) ). For more information contact Jackie Kookesh at jackie.kookesh@sealaska.com or 586-9229. (Flyer)

'Every Voice Matters'
StoryCorps project records stories of Alaska Native education experiences
By Katie Spielberger
Capital City Weekly
A new oral history project at the Juneau Public Library is inviting people of all ages to share stories around the theme of Alaska Native educational experiences. The Juneau Public Library is one of 10 libraries selected from more than 300 applicants nationwide to participate in the “StoryCorps @ your library” project, which will record community stories around specific themes over the next few months. The selected libraries, chosen through a peer-review process, will receive grant funding, training and equipment. Juneau Public Library program coordinator Beth Weigel and community outreach librarian Andi Hirsh are organizing the Juneau project...(more)

Deadline for Latseen Leadership Academy extended
Institute accepting applications through June 12
Sealaska Heritage has extended the application deadline for its annual Latseen Leadership Academy program to June 12. This year's academy for high school students will be held July 6-19 at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau. The academy will serve 40 high school students from Angoon, Prince of Wales, Klukwan and Juneau. Travel scholarships are available. The academy is designed to provide engaging culturally-based education and activities for high school students in support of their future academic and personal success with a focus on rigor, relevance, and relationships...(more) (Flyer) (Application)

Tlingit language immersion program co-founder Kitty Eddy retires after 31 years
By Scott Burton
KTOO
It's the last day of class in Eddy's combined kindergarten and first grade classroom. You'd think it'd be hard to gather the students, but it just takes to the count of five — in Tlingit. "Keijín. Daax'oon. Nás'k. Déiý. Tléix'!” Eddy says in a patient yet stern manner as the students move to the front of the class to sing and dance. The program, which began in 2000 with help from a federal grant, is a collaboration between Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Juneau School District. The two founding teachers were Eddy and Nancy Douglas...(more)

Prestigious honor for Juneau actor
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Juneau actor Frank Kaash Katasse grew up hearing stories, and a year ago he began using some of those stories, and his father's narrative technique, to help write his play, "They Don't Talk Back.""It's the first play I ever wrote," he said. "But I've been reading plays and acting for quite some time now." Just the same, he was surprised when the play won a place in a prestigious reading and workshop for American Indian playwrights during Native Voices at the Autry's 17th annual Festival of New Plays. Before the festival, which will see his play read in Los Angeles and San Diego, Katasse will spend a week in California with two other winning Native American writers who will "shape their plays with nationally recognized directors, dramaturges, and an acting company of exceptional Native American actors"...(more)

SHI to sponsor free formline design workshops in 10 communities
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor 10 free formline design workshops in 10 communities in June. We have lined up some exceptional teachers for our Jineit Art Academy this year. In conjunction with this workshop, SHI is giving school districts in each community a brand new Formline Arts Kit to be used in 4th to 8th grade classrooms, so we particularly encourage teachers in these school districts to take this opportunity to learn more about formline design, the foundation of Northwest Coast Alaska Native design. Click here to register by community: http://goo.gl/cXtw62 (Register) (Flyer)

Baby Raven Reads fosters next generation of Tlingit speakers
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Families and young children mill around tables in the lobby of the Walter Soboleff Building. There's a station for coloring, one for science. Margaret Katzeek and her 2-year-old niece Elayna are at the snack table. “Do you want some water?” Katzeek asks Elayna. “Do you remember what it's called? Heen. Let's say heen.” This is their second Baby Raven Reads family night. The free early childhood program run by Sealaska Heritage Institute builds on the strengths of Alaska Native culture in teaching early literacy. Katzeek says they're a fun way to learn the Tlingit language, for her niece and herself.“They say the best way to learn something and get to know something is trying to teach it,” she says, “so I definitely work on the words that I do know, I work with her on it lot”...(more)

Deadline for Latseen Leadership Academy extended
Institute accepting applications through May 29
Sealaska Heritage has extended the application deadline for its annual Latseen Leadership Academy program to May 29. This year's academy for high school students will be held July 6-19 at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau. The academy will serve 40 high school students from Angoon, Prince of Wales, Klukwan and Juneau. Travel scholarships are available. The academy is designed to provide engaging culturally-based education and activities for high school students in support of their future academic and personal success with a focus on rigor, relevance, and relationships...(more) (Flyer) (Application)

More than a building
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
To the many speakers and attendees at its May 15 opening ceremonies, the Walter Soboleff Building is a work of art, a home for culture, and a powerful symbol of Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people's perseverance and strength. It's also a fitting tribute to Dr. Walter Soboleff, an ordained Presbyterian minister who passed away in 2011 at the age of 102, inspired many in Southeast Alaska with his Sunday morning radio broadcasts, and worked to cultivate Alaska Native pride at a time it was much needed."He taught us the word of God, but... he also taught us the word of respect for our culture," said speaker Bill Thomas, who loaned historic Tlingit regalia to the building's museum....(more)

'Monumental' art unveiled at Soboleff Building
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
The three art pieces created for the Water Soboleff Building were described by Sealaska Heritage Institute as "monumental," an adjective that applies not only to their size -- all three are believed to be the biggest of their kind in the world -- but to their significance and stature: each one represents a major new work by an internationally recognized master artist and is an important addition to Juneau artistic landscape. More than art pieces for the cultures they represent (see related story below), the works are an integral and permanent part of the new arts and cultural center, and are reflective of the center's dual goal of honoring tradition while supporting Northwest Coast Native art's continuing evolution. Two of the pieces use unusual mediums -- one metal, one glass -- and abstract designs, while the third is based on historical examples of formline and is rendered in cedar, a traditional material....(more)

Northwest Coast Native art: An 'overt manifestation of culture'
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
Northwest Coast Native art isn't the only focus of the new Walter Soboleff Building, but it's likely to be the aspect that draws in the most visitors. For non-Natives hoping to gain a better understanding of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures, the artwork is a good place to start, offering an introduction to foundational concepts such as balance and harmony. Traditionally, art was such an integral part of the culture that there was no word for it in the Tlingit vocabulary, said SHI president Rosita Worl in a recent interview."What we would call art, it would be in Tlingit 'at.oow,' an owned or purchased thing, it's a clan treasure," she said...(more)

Photos: Grand opening: Walter Soboleff Building, May 15
Capital City Weekly
Tlingit artist Preston Singletary, right, takes part in the dedication ceremony of his glass clan house screen in the clan house of the Walter Soboleff Buidling during the grand opening Friday in Juneau, with Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian attendees, dressed in their regalia...(more)

History from multiple angles: The Killer Whale Dagger
By Mark Whitman
For the Capital City Weekly
More than a century ago, the eye of Vincent Soboleff's camera caught the Killer Whale Dagger's gleam. Held in Tlingit hands on a day when the blade mirrored the sun's light, it was a moment captured. On rare occasions when the dagger was brought forth, it arrived to words spoken:"This came to us from the sky." Unlike Tlingit artifact knives locked in private vaults of collectors who measure value in assessed dollars and solitary possession, the Killer Whale Dagger is a unique treasure, surrounded by collective story and guardianship...(more)

A 'great day for Alaska'
Hundreds gather to celebrate dedication of Walter Soboleff Building
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A glorious spring day provided the backdrop for the grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Building Friday as a crowd of hundreds gathered to mark the dedication of a major new Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultural facility in downtown Juneau. Attendees, many dressed in colorful regalia — yellow and green Chilkat robes and blue and red button blankets — celebrated with dancing, singing and formal speeches and oratory that emphasized the building's role in supporting the ongoing vitality of Northwest Coast Native art and culture...(more)

Slideshow: Soboleff Center grand opening
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
(Slideshow)

Walter Soboleff Center opens in Juneau as a hub for Southeast Native culture
Pat Forgey
Alaska Dispatch News
Sealaska Heritage Institute dedicated its gleaming new Walter Soboleff Center on Friday, bringing to life a $20 million dream that it took a decade to complete. The new cultural center will do something unusual in the world of art and museums -- it will feature the story of Alaska's Native people being told by Alaska Natives themselves. "This building is much more than a physical facility," said Rosita Worl, president of Sealaska Heritage. "It symbolizes the effort of Native people to ensure our cultural survival, but at the same time selectively embrace the benefits of our modern society." With the building now complete, the irony of the building's design nearly being stopped by the city of Juneau's historic preservation ordinance now seems just a humorous aside...(more)

Walter Soboleff Building opens in Juneau with revelry, remembrance
By Channel 2 News staff
KTUU
The opening of the Sealaska Heritage Institute's Walter Soboleff Center in Juneau took up a full city block Friday and featured a grand ceremony. The Angoon Children Dancers chanted, drummed and danced on Seward Street in front of the building. They were chosen because many of the children in the group are from Angoon, hometown of the late Dr. Walter Soboleff. Many of the dancers are from the same clan as or descendants of Soboleff, the first Alaska Native to serve on the state Board of Education who also served as director of Sealaska Corporation. He passed away in 2011 at the age of 102. On Friday, Soboleff's son Sasha gave the opening prayer. He urged people not to forget what his father stood for...(more)

Sacred architecture: Walter Soboleff Building opens its doors
By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO
The Sealaska Heritage Institute unveiled its new structure in downtown Juneau today. It's called the Walter Soboleff Building after the late Tlingit scholar, elder and religious leader. Inside stands a full-sized replica of a traditional red cedar clan house. At the opening ceremony, the Aangun Yatx'i dance in their regalia in front of the Walter Soboleff building. Davina Cole is the arts assistant here. She clutches her four-month-old baby girl tightly to her chest. “We're Yanyeidí from the T'aaku Kwáan area. We're little wolves. She's my baby pup,” she says. Cole says she's looking forward to what the Soboleff Building will offer her daughter. They've already gone to a Baby Raven Reads class before the grand opening. It teaches pre-literacy through Native stories...(more)

Video: Preston Singletary's monumental glass screen
By Scott Burton
KTOO
Tlingit glass artist Preston Singletary was chosen as one of three people to contribute monumental art to Sealaska Heritage Institute‘s new Walter Soboleff Building. In this video he explains the inspiration for his glass screen and his take on contemporary indigenous art...(more)

Sealaska opens Walter Soboleff Building, plans park featuring native artists
By Lance David
KINY
The Sealaska Heritage Institute conducted a grand opening of its Walter Soboleff Building in downtown Juneau last week. Prior to the grand opening, Institute President Rosita Worl said on Action Line that phase two is already in the works, explaining, "I've been telling people that I really believe Juneau can become the Northwest's art capital, so we're pursuing a number of different programs to integrate art into everything. Phase two will be a native artists' park. I feel like Juneau is deserving of something spectacular with native art in park. We may have to push Sealaska off their parking lot and build them another"...(more)

Grand Opening Ceremony Wraps
A huge thanks to everyone who participated, watched it live and attended our Grand Opening Ceremony for the Walter Soboleff Building! It was truly a historic event that we won't ever forget. Lots of photos of the event here: https://goo.gl/Lx3Psi. KTOO posted a time-lapse video of the installation of the glass screen in the clan house: https://goo.gl/Rx8jw8. The exhibit will officially open tomorrow morning, May 16. (Program)

Sealaska Heritage Institute conducts grand opening of Walter Soboleff Building
By Lori James
KINY
Rosita Worl, the institute's president, talked of the two ceremonies, "What we found out is that we needed to have two separate ceremonies. We actually have a formal ceremony, where we're going to be acknowledging our great officials here in Juneau, but in this part of the ceremony we also have to have our ceremonial spokespeople welcoming the people. So in that morning session it will be opened up with the Children of Angoon dancing and then we'll have the formal ceremony. Then right after that we will then move to the dock, we'll have a dance precession. We'll meet the canoe group coming from Hanes and Klukwan. At the marine park we will have a number of dances. Then we'll have another procession right back to the center of the building where we begin our traditional ceremony"...(more)

Out of the ashes: A downtown eyesore is transformed
By Jeremy Hsieh
KTOO
In 2004, an awning patch-job went bad and led to a fire that razed a historic commercial building in the heart of downtown Juneau, where the grand opening of Sealaska Heritage Institute's Walter Soboleff Building will happen Friday. In its 108-year history, the two-story, wood-framed building at the corner of Front and Seward streets had gone by many names: The C.W. Young Building, Rusher's Hardware, the Skinner Building, the Endicott Building and the Town Center Mall...(more)

Monumental art makes Juneau's new Walter Soboleff Building shine
By Scott Burton
KTOO
The new Walter Soboleff Building in downtown Juneau will soon be fully unveiled to the public. In addition to observing the structure's architecture, visitors will be surrounded by monumental art.
Rosita Worl says she wanted both traditional and contemporary art. Rosita Worl says she wanted both traditional and contemporary art. “We knew we wanted to have the best of our artwork,” says Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl. “And we also knew we wanted to have all of our three nations represented: the Tlingit, Haida and the Tsimshians.” By “we” she means the institute's Native Artist Committee: Tlingit artist Nathan Jackson, master Haida weaver Delores Churchill, Tlingit contemporary artist Nicholas Galanin and formline expert Steve Brown. They solicited art, deliberated over the proposals and chose three. But what is monumental art?...(more)

Soboleff Center opening brings visitors by canoe
North Tide Canoe Kwaan from Haines arrived in Juneau on Wednesday
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
They just landed in Juneau on Wednesday and, boy, were their arms tired. That's because members of the North Tide Canoe Kwáan didn't fly or ferry in like many other visitors arriving to celebrate Sealaska Heritage Institute's new Walter Soboleff Center grand opening — they paddled...(more)

Tlingit civil rights hero William Paul Sr. remembered
By Amy Fletcher
Capital City Weekly
Juneau residents gathered to share their memories and impressions of Tlingit civil rights activist and lawyer William Paul Sr. last week on what would have been Paul's 130th birthday, May 7, one week before Sealaska Heritage Institute's May 15 dedication of the Walter Soboleff Building's archives facility in his name. The meeting, organized by local lawyer and researcher Kathy Ruddy for the second year in a row, welcomed input from about a dozen participants, some of whom knew Paul personally, with a larger goal of bringing recognition to Paul's contributions to Alaska history. hough not yet a household name in Alaska, Paul is recognized by scholars as a pivotal figure in the history of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971, and was the first Native attorney in Alaska, as well as the first Native legislator. An early member of the Alaska Native Brotherhood, the country's first Native civil rights organization, he worked to secure a wide range of civil rights for Alaska Natives beginning in 1920, including voting, citizenship, fishing and school desegregation...(more)

Grand opening of Soboleff Building set for Friday
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute will kick off a Grand Opening Ceremony for the Walter Soboleff Building at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, May 15 in front of the building on Seward St. with a formal ceremony, which will be followed by a canoe welcome, then a traditional ceremony, scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. The Sealaska parking lot will be set aside for spectators, and the event will be broadcast live on 360North and on sealaskaheritage.org. SHI's Council of Traditional Scholars, which guides the SHI on programs, has been meeting since 2014 to help plan the Grand Opening Ceremony. The day will mark years of planning, fundraising and finally the completion of the new building, said SHI President Rosita Worl...(more)

Singletary begins installation of glass screen
Glass artist Preston Singletary is here this week installing the giant glass screen in the clan house at the Walter Soboleff Building. He is joined by apprentices David Roger Lang and Mary Goddard. Singletary's piece will be the largest glass screen in the world, measuring 17 feet wide and 12 feet high at its peak and rendered in carved, amber-and-black glass. It will eventually be flanked by two, glass seven-foot posts depicting Eagle and Raven warriors. Supported by a grant from ArtPlace America.

Office d'art: No detail spared in Sealaska Heritage Institute's new space
SHI unveils Soboleff Center to public on May 15
By MELISSA GRIFFITHS
JUNEAU EMPIRE
What most people will see of the Walter Soboleff Center is art — including the building's exterior, a lavish gift shop, formline carvings adorning an interior longhouse and exhibits of cultural objects and art — but an artistic aesthetic has dictated the form and function of the center down to the smallest detail and up to the highest offices. During a sneak preview of the new building, Lee Kadinger, Sealaska Heritage Institute's chief of operations, provided a tour of the spaces beyond the ground floor, where art is abundant and obvious. “Any place we could add art that typically you don't find it, we wanted to,” he said...(more)

SHI to sponsor family event for Baby Raven Reads 
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a family event for Alaska Native families with children ages 0-5. This free event is part of SHI's Baby Raven Reads program, which promotes pre-literacy, language development and school readiness. Families are invited to join SHI for storytelling, songs and other cultural activities. We will be joined by All Nation's Children dance group. Free books and a snack will be provided. The event will be held from 2pm-3:30pm, Saturday, May 23 at the Walter Soboleff Building. For more information contact Jackie Kookesh at 586-9229. (Flyer)

Anchorage textile conservator on loan for new exhibit
Textile Conservator Sarah Owens was at Sealaska Heritage this week from the Anchorage Museum to provide specialized assistance with a well-used Haida button blanket, which will be part of SHI's grand opening exhibit. The blanket, made in the 1970s by Selina Peratrovich for her daughter Delores Churchill, has hundreds of abalone buttons sewn in a beaver design originally drawn by Nathan Jackson. The blanket has become worn through many years of ceremonial use, and Sarah recommended putting a backing on it so it could be placed on a mannequin without further weakening the fabric. She carefully evaluated the cloth and sewed the backing to it. We are very thankful to Monica Shah, Chief Conservator, and the Anchorage Museum for contributing Sarah's professional skills to our project.

Applications for summer theater program now online
Sealaska Heritage is accepting applications from students who want to learn storytelling and theatre during our Voices on the Land Cultural Performing Arts Intensive this summer. The project taps traditional and performing arts to increase literacy skills and student engagement. The intensive will run June 29-July2 for 4-5 grade students and from July 6-11 for middle school students in Juneau. To apply, submit an application to katrina.hotch@sealaska.com by June 5. (Grades 4 & 5 Application) (Middle School Application).

SHI prepares for grand opening of Soboleff building
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
Sealaska Heritage Institute will host the grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Building on Friday, May 15, in Juneau. A day of ceremonies and celebration is planned and all are welcome. The ceremony begins at 8:30 a.m. with a formal program of comments and recognitions from dignitaries and special guests. At 12:30 p.m., there will be a coming ashore and welcome ceremony at the Marine Park dock marking the arrival of North Tide Canoe Kwaan, followed by dance group performances. The canoe paddlers and dancers will then proceed to the Soboleff Center...(more)

SHI to debut Gumboot Camp!
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor a Gumboot Camp, a free preschool program for incoming kindergarteners. Gumboot Camp is part of Baby Raven Reads, a culturally-responsive kindergarten readiness program. The camp will run Aug. 10-14 in Juneau at Glacier Valley Elementary School. If you are interested or want more information, contact LaVina VanSickle, Project Coordinator at 586-9125 or lavina.vansickle@sealaska.com or Jackie Kookesh, Education Director at 586-9229 or jackie.kookesh@sealaska.com (Flyer)

Call for teaching artists
Sealaska Heritage is seeking a Native artist to teach storytelling and theatre during our Voices on the Land Cultural Performing Arts Intensive this summer. The project taps traditional and performing arts to increase literacy skills and student engagement. The intensive will run June 29-July2 for 4-5 grade students and from July 6-11 for middle school students in Juneau. To apply, submit headshot, resume and letter of intent to katrina.hotch@sealaska.com by May 12…(more)

SHI to sponsor math and culture academy
Institute accepting applications through April 30
Applications are now available for Sealaska Heritage Institute's annual math academy, which teaches math skills through Native art and cultural knowledge. The program, Opening the Gate, will include culture-based classes where math is taught in a hands-on way through Native art practices, such as basketry, weaving and formline design. This year staff will again be offering Math in a Basket, a program developed by the nonprofit Dramatic Results...(more) (Flyer)

SHI schedule of events, updated
We have an updated schedule of events and a lot of things going on in the coming months, including the grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Building on May 15. We also will sponsor our Math and Culture Summer Academy in Juneau from June 19-29 and our Latseen Leadership Academy from July 6-19. And we'll have more events for our Baby Raven Reads program, where parents can get culturally-relevant books, and our Voices on the Land project. Check out our upcoming events flyer for more information. (Flyer)

JSD replaces texts that spurred protests
Replacement documents tell stories of Native experience
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Companion texts from the Juneau School District's new Reading Wonders curriculum that were criticized for their sugarcoated portrayal of Native experiences have been replaced, the school district announced. Teacher Shgen George had an emotional reaction when she discovered new books in her classroom depicting a young Native American girl at a boarding school and a young Native American boy removed from his home, walking the Trail of Tears. “My immediate reaction was I just felt so trivialized,” George said...(more)

SHI to sponsor family night for Baby Raven Reads
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a family night for Alaska Native families with children ages 0-5. This free event is part of SHI's Baby Raven Reads program, which promotes pre-literacy, language development and school readiness. Families are invited to join SHI for storytelling, songs and other cultural activities. Mary Folletti, an advanced Tlingit language student, will be leading language games, and Where is Mouse Woman? will be read aloud. Free books and a snack will be provided. Family night will be held from 5pm-6:30pm, Thursday, April 9 at the Walter Soboleff Building. For more information contact Jackie Kookesh at 586-9229...(more) (Flyer)

SHI seeking volunteers for grand opening
SHI is looking for volunteers for the Walter Soboleff Building Grand Opening, scheduled May 15. We need volunteers from Thursday, May 14 through Saturday, May 16. If you are interested in volunteering, please follow the link to fill out our volunteer application form. Apply: http://goo.gl/9699vo Volunteers working independently must be over the age of 18. SHI will accept volunteers between the ages of 14-18 if they work alongside a parent/guardian. No children under the age of 14 are allowed to be with parents/guardians while they volunteer. Each volunteer will receive a T-shirt! For more information contact Mary Richey at 586-9257 or mary.richey@sealaska.com.

Baby Raven Reads ... and sings, dances and tells stories
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute at the end of March made apt first use of the clan house in the new Walter Soboleff Center: as a place to focus on children for a new three-year pre-literacy and school readiness program, Baby Raven Reads."It's fitting the first group in this building is the children, who get to grow up in this place," said an initial speaker, adding that organizers had conducted a cleansing and blessing ceremony that afternoon...(more)

SHI to sponsor Latseen Leadership Academy
Institute accepting applications through May 22
Applications are now available for Sealaska Heritage Institute's annual Latseen Leadership Academy program. This year's academy for high school students will be held July 6-19 at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau. The academy will serve 40 high school students from Angoon, Prince of Wales, Klukwan and Juneau. Travel scholarships are available. The academy is designed to provide engaging culturally-based education and activities for high school students in support of their future academic and personal success with a focus on rigor, relevance, and relationships...(more) (Flyer) (Application)

SHI to sponsor first family night for Baby Raven Reads
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a family night for Alaska Native families with children ages 0-5. This free event is part of SHI's Baby Raven Reads program, which promotes pre-literacy, language development and school readiness. Families are invited to join us for storytelling, songs and other cultural activities. Family night will be held on Wednesday, March 25 from 5pm-6:30pm at the Walter Soboleff Building. For more information contact Jackie Kookesh at 586-9229 or jackie.kookesh@sealaska.com (Flyer)

Learn about math through Native art!
SHI will bring together about 50 students from Angoon, Hoonah, Klukwan, Hydaburg and Juneau for 10 days to enhance their math skills through traditional cultural ways of knowing. The academy will be held at the University of Alaska Southeast from June 19-29, 2015. Travel, food, and accommodations will be provided at no cost to the participants. All students will stay on campus with chaperones. If a school district employee or parent is interested in being a chaperone please let us know. Please share information with your middle schools students about the Summer Math and Culture Academy.
(Flyer) (Application)

On donating art and IRS rules
A note to artists who have donated art to a nonprofit or who plan to donate a piece: If you make a donation to a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit, such as Sealaska Heritage, the donation is tax deductible. The nonprofit should give you a receipt acknowledging the donation, but because of IRS rules, the nonprofit recipient isn't allowed to put a value on donated pieces. The IRS requires donors to go through their own appraiser to set a value for tax purposes. SHI is seeking funds to provide business education to artists. We'll keep you apprised of any new developments.

Photos: Six months in the making
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Tsimshian carver David Boxley, of Metlakatla, explains the formline design on the cedar panels to Sealaska Heritage Institutes' Nobu Koch and Kari Groven, right, as work to install the Tsimshian house front at the Walter Soboleff Center started on Monday. Boxley and his son, David Robert Boxley, left, spent six months carving and painting the panels that will greet visitors to the center...(more)

Carving facility hosts first crafts class
By Dan Rudy
Wrangell Sentinel
All of last weekend, the first of what is intended to be many cultural courses was held at Wrangell Cooperative Association's new carving facility, which was finished last autumn. From Thursday afternoon through Sunday, local Native residents were shown how to craft with sea otter pelts by Jeremiah James, operator of Yakutat Furs since 2010. "This is the ninth class I've done," James explained, and the second he has delivered in Wrangell. It was his first time working in the new facility however, and he was impressed. "What an awesome building to be in," he commented. In particular, he said the combination of overhead and natural lighting had been helpful...(more)

Otter hide sewing is first class held in Wrangell's carving facility
By Katarina Sostaric
KSTK News
Wrangell's new carving facility hosted its first Alaska Native craft class last weekend, and about 20 residents signed up to learn the basics of sewing otter skins. On a Sunday afternoon, the carving facility was full of people quietly working on their sewing projects. They were hand-sewing sea otter skins to make hats, mittens, headbands, pillows and capes. Arthur Larsen was sewing a bomber hat, which will have flaps to cover his ears. “It's my first time in a class, and it's a really good experience,” Larsen said...(more)

SHI sponsors cultural orientation on carving in Juneau
Sealaska Heritage in February sponsored a talk on carving in the Juneau School District. Tlingit artist Wayne Pricegave a presentation to Juneau students about how important it is to know how to adze if you are a carver. He also talked about the importance of tools and traditional knowledge to carvers. Sealaska Heritage sponsored his talk as part its cultural orientation program. Wayne is in Juneau now adzing cedar for the Walter Soboleff Building.

Photo: Moving Sealaska's treasures
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Chuck Smythe, Culture and History Director for the Sealaska Heritage Institute, watches Jon Loring, left, place a spruce root basket from SHI's collection into a protective mount for transport and storage on Tuesday. SHI is moving their collection to the vault in the new Walter Soboleff Center this week. Lorings work is being paid by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities...(more)

SHI chooses apprentices to make, install monumental glass piece
Sealaska Heritage Institute has chosen six apprentices to help create and install a massive glass screen for the new Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau. Three of the apprentices will help glass artist Preston Singletary make the screen at his studio in Seattle in March. The other three will help Singletary install it in the clan house inside the new building in May. The piece will be unveiled to the public at the grand opening on May 15. The people chosen to help Singletary make the screen are ...(more)

Save the date: Grand opening for new building scheduled May 15
Formal opening to be followed by traditional grand opening ceremony
The Traditional Grand Opening Ceremony for the Walter Soboleff Building will be held on May 15, 2015 beginning at 1:30 PM. The traditional ceremony will be led by Ken Grant, T'akdeintaan, and David Katzeek, Shangukeidí, and followed by brief comments from clan leaders. The Council of Traditional Scholars has been meeting to plan the agenda for the Traditional Grand Opening Ceremony. Clan leaders, who plan to attend and offer a few comments, should immediately advise Dr. Chuck Smythe at chuck.smythe@sealaska.com. Additionally, those dance groups that plan to attend the May 15 Opening Ceremony should also advise Events Coordinator Jasmine James at jasmine.james@sealaska.com. The formal opening ceremony officials and dignitaries will begin at 9 AM, followed by the arrival of canoes. The North Tide Canoe Kwáan dugout canoe will be placed in the monumental art space in front of the Walter Soboleff Building. Canoe groups should also advise Events Coordinator Jasmine James at jasmine.james@sealaska.com if they plan to participate in the Grand Opening.

Curator Kelsey Lutz consults with Nadine Hafner, SHI's archives and collections management specialist. Photo by Brian WallaceSHI to partner with Department of Interior on move to new building
Move to begin this week
Sealaska Heritage Institute will partner with Sitka National Historical Park to move its collection of objects into the new Walter Soboleff Building in Juneau. A little-known clause in the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) authorizes the National Park Service as part of the Department of Interior to offer advice, support and technical expertise to ANCSA corporations and Native groups in the preservation, management, display and interpretation of cultural resources...(more)

New logo at Sealaska Heritage captures "Heritage Forward"
In the near future, you might notice something different about Sealaska Heritage. In late 2014, we adopted a new logo, and we are slowly phasing it into our materials, a new website and our “Box of Knowledge”—the new Walter Soboleff Building—where it will be featured prominently on the signage and as large metal accent pieces on the exterior. The central form or three-pointed element of the new logo is commonly known as a “trigon”—although master Northwest Coast artist Robert Davidson, who created our new icon, coined the word “trineg” to describe it. It is an ancient shape prevalent in the formline designs developed by the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian of the Northwest Coast, and it has been found on some of the oldest ethnographic objects in the world...(more)

Clan hats, clan at.óowu, to be featured in first exhibit at new building
Clans that want to participate should contact SHI
SHI is sponsoring an exhibit of clan hats and other at.óowu in the new Walter Soboleff Building. This exhibit is unique in that the clan hats represent the ongoing cultural life and ceremonies of Southeast Alaska Natives.  Four clans have agreed to loan their clan hats and other regalia for the premier exhibit; however they will be able to take their clan hats out of the exhibit if they are needed for ceremonies. The clan hat exhibit will be featured for a year and will open during the Grand Opening Ceremony on May 15.  If your clan is interested in having your clan hat exhibited, please contact Dr. Chuck Smythe at chuck.smythe@sealaska.com

SHI sponsors skin-sewing workshop
Sealaska Heritage held a skin-sewing workshop over the weekend at Gajaa Hít in Juneau. We were able to accommodate students on our waiting list from previous years. The workshops are part of our Sustainable Art Program, and through this class, which was taught by Jeremiah James, students learned to use skin-sewing machines. (Photos by Brian Wallace) (Photos)

SHI to sponsor math and culture academy in Angoon
Explore math through the art of weaving! Sealaska Heritage will sponsor a math-and-culture academy in Angoon this month with artist and teacher Shgen George. The academy is for students in grades 6-8 and will be held at Eli Katanook School from February 22-26. Contact your teacher to sign up. For more information contact jackie.kookesh@sealaska.com. Funded through a grant from the Alaska Native Education Program. (Flyer)

SHI hires new archivist
A big welcome to our new archivist, Nadine Hafner, who comes to us with a lot of experience in her field. For the past eight years, Nadine has been working with Indigenous documentary heritage as the archivist for the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs. She also has experience working with a number of different archival institutions, including the Museum of Anthropology, the City of Vancouver Archives, the Canadian Council of Archives, and the Library and Archives Canada. She earned her bachelor's degree in anthropology and her master's degree in archival studies from the University of British Columbia. We are very happy to have her on board! (Photo by Brian Wallace)

SHI seeking art for new store, contact info for artists
If you are interested in selling arts-and-crafts products at wholesale prices to Sealaska Heritage please email a photo, description and wholesale price to Rick Bonifant, general manager of the Sealaska Heritage Store at richard.bonifant@sealaska.com. Purchases depend on the quality and market. Artists: Please take a moment to fill out our survey and share your contact information with us. We will use emails to ensure you get timely notices about art opportunities. (Survey)
(Flyer)

SHI recruiting for project coordinator, store assistant manager, sales associate
SHI is recruiting for a project coordinator to provide support to the institute's Art Department in designing, coordinating and implementing art activities and programs. Priority will be given to Northwest Coast artists. SHI also is seeking a part time, seasonal store assistant manager and a sales associate, who will be responsible for establishing and maintaining a high level of customer service and assisting the retail manager in measuring business trends, maximizing sales/profitability, staff development and all aspects of merchandising and inventory control. Applicants should send resumes and cover letters to shijobs@sealaska.com. (Project Coordinator Job Description) (Store Assistant Manager Job Description) (Sales Associate)

SHI schedule of events
We have a lot of things going on right now and this summer, from our scholarship application period, which ends on March 1, to the grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Building on May 15. We also will sponsor our Math and Culture Summer Academy in Juneau from June 20-29 and our Latseen Leadership Academy from July 6-19. And we have some new programs coming online, including our Baby Raven Reads program where parents can get culturally-relevant books. Check out our upcoming events flyer for more information. (Flyer)

Governor's Awards photos
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Alaska State Council on the Arts and the Alaska Humanities Forum honored nine Alaskans last week at the 2015 Governor's Awards for the Arts and Humanities ceremony at the Juneau Arts & Culture Center. In addition to the four Arts awardees and the four Humanities awardees, the Alaska State Council on the Arts announced Frank Soos of Fairbanks as the 2014-2016 Alaska State Writer Laureate, replacing Nora Marks Dauenhauer of Juneau. The 2015 awardees are...(more)

SHI launches program to teach literacy skills through the arts
Capital City Weekly
Sealaska Heritage Institute has launched a new program this month to improve literacy skills and increase use of the Tlingit language through performing arts and digital storytelling. The program, Voices on the Land, will integrate performing arts and digital storytelling into six Juneau schools over three years through artists in residence, digital storytelling and a teacher training academy. The first component — the artists in residence program — launched in January 2015 at Gastineau Elementary, Harborview Elementary and Dzantik'I Heeni Middle School...(more)

SHI recruiting for project coordinator
SHI is recruiting for a project coordinator to provide support to the institute's Art Department in designing, coordinating and implementing art activities and programs. Applicants should send resumes and cover letters to shijobs@sealaska.com. (Full Job Description)

Tlingit MacBeth play produced in 2004 by Perseverance Theatre with Tlingit ttranslations by SHI's John Marks.SHI launches program to teach literacy skills through the arts
SHI is launching an innovative program this month to improve literacy skills and increase use of the Tlingit language through performing arts and digital storytelling. The program, Voices on the Land, will integrate performing arts and digital storytelling into six Juneau schools over three years through artists in residence, digital storytelling and a teacher training academy...(more)

Support SHI programs through Pick.Click.Give
Support the youth and public education programs by giving to Sealaska Heritage Institute through Pick.Click.Give while applying for your 2015 permanent fund dividend. All donations are tax deductible. Also, this year, ten lucky winners who share part of their PFD through Pick.Click.Give will be given an EXTRA dividend. The drawing, which is sponsored by the Alaska Community Foundation, will occur on September 15th.

SHI accepting applications for college, voc-tech scholarships
Institute offering cash incentive to early birds
SHI is accepting scholarship applications for the 2015-2016 school year.
The deadline to apply is March 1, 2015. However, the institute is offering a $50 incentive to those who complete their scholarship application on or before Feb. 1 and who are accepted as scholarship recipients; if selected as a recipient, the $50 will be included in their scholarship award. Scholarships must be filled out and submitted online. Awards will be made to Sealaska shareholders and descendants enrolled in accredited colleges, universities and voc-tech schools. The scholarships are given to roughly 400 students per year...(more) (Apply)

SHI recruiting for Store Assistant Manager
Sealaska Heritage Institute is recruiting for a store assistant manager, who will be responsible for establishing and maintaining a high level of customer service and assisting the retail manager in measuring business trends, maximizing sales/profitability, staff development and all aspects of merchandising and inventory control. To apply, send resume and cover letter to shijobs@sealaska.com. (Full Job Description)

SHI recruiting for Publications Specialist
Sealaska Heritage Institute is recruiting for a publications specialist, who will be responsible for assisting in the development, design and production of books, curriculum, brochures and other publications. The successful applicant will have proven project management experience, a bachelor's degree in journalism, English, communications, public affairs or related field (or relevant/related work experience). To apply, send resume and cover letter to shijobs@sealaska.com. (Full Job Description)

Bright moments in the Arts 2014
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Empire's annual Bright Moments in the Arts feature is designed to celebrate creativity in all its forms. Each of the following lists of five great moments from 2014 presents just a tiny slice of the whole picture, as viewed through the words and memories of one community member. Taken as a whole, the lists are reflective of a spirit of gratitude toward all those who devote their time, energy and talent through the arts, enriching our lives in the process. To share your own list, leave a comment here or post to Facebook with your thoughts...(more)

SHI staff begin moving in to Soboleff Center
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Construction of the Walter Soboleff Center reached an important milestone last week as Sealaska Heritage Institute staff began moving into new offices on the second floor of the unfinished building. The center, located on the corner of Seward and Front Streets downtown, will remain closed to the public as construction on the first and third floors continues, with a formal opening date set for May 15. During a brief ceremony Friday afternoon to mark SHI's occupation of the building, staff members Donald Gregory and Frank Katasse, who are of the Raven and Eagle moieties respectively, hung stalks of devil's club above the door, an ancient practice...(more)

Offices closed through January 2
Sealaska Heritage Institute's offices will be closed to the public through 4:30 pm, Friday, Jan. 2 as staff moves to the new Walter Soboleff Building. The institute's archives will be open by appointment only from January 5 through February 20 due to the move. Staff will respond to email and other correspondence as they are able to during the move.

Photo: Moving day
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Anthony Harding, left, and John Gregory move boxes of files into the finished second-floor offices of the Sealaska Heritage Institute in the new Walter Soboleff Center on Thursday. Work continues on the first floor but Institute employees will be working in their new offices by Jan. 1. The Grand Opening is scheduled for May 15...(more)

Sealaska Heritage Institute begins move into Walter Soboleff Center
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Sealaska Heritage Institute started moving into its new home in the yet-to-be-opened Walter Soboleff Center this week. Chief Operating Officer Lee Kadinger hopes Sealaska Heritage Institute will be relocated by the end of January. The grand opening of the Walter Soboleff Center is May 15. “Next door will be our new home,” Kadinger says from his current office at One Sealaska Plaza. “So every time you hear we're having a Native Lecture Series, it'll be at Sealaska Heritage. Every time you hear that we're having weaving classes, it'll be at Sealaska Heritage. Everything that we do isn't going to be scattered around in different places or classrooms or meeting rooms; it'll be at Sealaska Heritage"...(more)

2015 Governor's Awards include Sealaska Heritage Institute
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Juneau-based nonprofit Sealaska Heritage Institute has been formally honored for its contributions to the arts in Alaska with a 2015 Governor's Award for the Arts and Humanities. The Alaska State Council on the Arts and the Alaska Humanities Forum announced the recipients of the awards Tuesday, as well as the Alaska State Writer Laureate for the 2014-2016 term. Sealaska Heritage Institute, one of eight recipients, earned this year's Alaska Native Arts award...(more)

Coastline search leads to first residents' camps
By Ed Schoenfeld
CoastAlaska News
The Earth's crust is more flexible than you think – especially in Southeast Alaska. Growing and shrinking icefields and glaciers, and rising and falling oceans have altered the region's coastline over time. Understanding those changes is helping scientists learn more about the area's early human habitation. A Southeast geologist talked about what's been discovered during a Nov. 25 Sealaska Heritage Institute Native American Heritage Month lecture...(more)

Photo by Christy EriksenKolkhorst Ruddy donates $25,000 for building
Juneau's Kathy Kolkhorst Ruddy has donated $25,000 for the Walter Soboleff Building in memory of Cyril George, Sr.! Tlingit Elder Cyril was the Clan Leader of the Deisheetaan (Raven/Beaver) Clan from Khaakáak'w Hít (Basket Bay Arch House) of Angoon. He was a gifted orator and storyteller who widely shared his knowledge with students and scholars alike. He Walked Into The Forest in April. Kathy is a long-time supporter of the Native community and often assisted Nora and Richard Dauenhauer in their work. Thank you for your generosity Kathy!

Photo by Julien CapmeilSHI recruiting apprentices to work with glass artist Preston Singletary
SHI is recruiting apprentices to work with Tlingit glass artist Preston Singletary on a clan house screen and two house posts for the Walter Soboleff Building. One to two apprenticeships will take place in Preston's workshop in Seattle, Washington, over one week in March 2015. Another apprenticeship will be located in Juneau, Alaska in early May 2015. This will be a two-to-three day intensive apprenticeship focusing on the installation of this one-of-a-kind artwork. Apprentices will receive a stipend to cover travel, accommodations and food. Deadline to apply: 4 pm, January 12. For more informant contact SHI's Arts Assistant Davina Cole: davina.cole@sealaska.com or 907.586.9230. (Full Description)

Photo by Brian WallaceLecture now online
If you missed our last lecture in November, you can now watch it online. In his lecture, The Search for Early Habitation Sites on Ancient Shorelines, Forest Geologist Jim Baichtal talked about the model scientists have developed that is helping them discover ancient cultural sites in Southeast Alaska inhabited by people thousands of years ago. (Video)

Jineit: Carving and adzing by Wayne Price and Donald Gregory
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Haines-based Tlingit carver Wayne Price will demonstrate his adzing techniques and Juneau artist Donald Gregory will be carving hooks at Jineit, located in the Sealaska Building, Sealaska Plaza. Price, one of the artists currently working on the Soboleff Building downtown, said a previous Empire interview that learning traditional carving involves knowledge of how art relates to indigenous culture and history...(more)

Glaciers, seals and stories
By Mary Catharine Martin
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
A team of researchers and Yakutat residents has been working for the last four years to show, through archaeological research, the truth of oral tradition about Yakutat's historical seal camps. They've successfully uncovered sites buried for years, and now they're making a movie about their work. Aron Crowell, Alaska director of the Smithsonian Institution's Arctic Studies Center, and Judy Ramos, who is completing her Ph.D. dissertation in indigenous studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, shared their Yakutat experience as part of Sealaska Heritage Institute's series of lectures honoring Native American Heritage month...(more)

Lecture now online
If you missed our lecture last week, you can now watch it online. Judy Ramos and Aron Crowell talked about the rich resources around Yakutat Bay, the historical importance of seals to the people there and also a collaborative project that led them to an historic site known in oral histories that had been long obscured by environmental changes. (Video)

SHI wraps up Native American Heritage Month lecture series Tuesday
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a free lecture on Tuesday, Nov. 25, entitled “Changing shorelines and the Search for Early Habitation Sites” led by Jim Baichtal, Forest Geologist with the Tongass National Forest. Here is a synopsis of what he will be discussing: An extensive literature search and years of field reconnaissance have resulted in a dataset of over 450 shell-bearing raised marine deposits throughout Southeast Alaska. It includes site location, elevation, and description when available, and over 250 radiocarbon dates. ...(more)

Alaska Writer Laureate Nora Dauenhauer finishes up two-year term
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Alaska State Writer Laureate Nora Marks Dauenhauer sits at the dining room table in her Douglas home, a stack of books and a cup of tea in front of her. Behind her hangs a lithograph of Tlingit elder Jessie Dalton by R.T. Wallen, and, on the opposite wall, rows of family photographs. A line of windows runs along the back of the room, looking out toward Gastineau Channel. At the table, Dauenhauer thumbs through a dog-eared copy of one of her books, “Life Woven with Song,” selects a poem called “Willie,” written for her father, Tlingit carver and fisherman Willie Marks, and begins to read. Her voice is soft and unhurried, a little wavery after 87 years of life, but measured and strong, with a gentle lilt of emotion...(more)

SHI accepting applications for free Native artist market
SHI is accepting applications from artists who want a table at the Jineit Native Artist Market at Centennial Hall during the Community Holiday Fair. The fair will run from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Friday, December 5. The application must be submitted by Monday, December 1 before 4:30 p.m. online or at the offices of SHI. Each vendor will be provided one table. Set up time and breakdown time are to be determined. There will be no fee for this holiday fair artist market. (Application)

SHI to sponsor lectures for Native American Heritage Month
SHI will sponsor its annual noon lecture series to celebrate Native American Heritage Month in November. Topics for the brown-bag lunch series will range from a story about the theft of a prominent totem pole by the famed Hollywood actor John Barrymore to sealing camps in Yakutat. The lectures will be held from 12-1 pm in the 4th floor boardroom at Sealaska Plaza in Juneau. Attendees are invited to bring their own lunches. The talks also will be videotaped and posted online...(more) (Flyer)


Native language is theme of Elders and Youth Conference
By Lisa Demer
ALASKA DISPATCH NEWS
The importance of Alaska Native languages to culture, identity and individual well-being took center stage Monday as the First Alaskans Institute's Elders and Youth Conference -- the precursor to the biggest Native gathering of the year -- began in Anchorage. A teenager from Yakutat gave his keynote address before a packed crowd of hundreds in Tlingit, then English, explaining that some Native words cannot be translated. A fluent Inupiaq speaker from Nome expressed regret to everyone who never had the chance to learn their Native language, and to those who decades ago were punished for speaking it. Members of the state's new Alaska Native language council urged that more be done to study and restore languages, as a way to save the culture...(more)

Photos: Careful, careful
By Sarah Cannard
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Construction workers collaborate Friday to install a glass panel along the outside of the Walter Soboloff Center, currently under construction in downtown Juneau...(more) (Front Page View)

Juneau archives facility to be named for Tlingit hero 
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The archives facility at the new Walter Soboleff building will be named for Tlingit Native rights hero William L. Paul, Sr., who was a major force in Alaska history and is recognized as the father of the Alaska Native land claims. The William L. Paul, Sr., Archives houses 3,100 linear feet of archival and historical manuscripts and papers, photographs, and audio and visual recordings. The archives also include historical documents, manuscripts, and papers of individuals of importance to both the indigenous people of the region and Alaska history, and over 60,000 historic photographs. The Archives currently houses more than 5,000 historical and contemporary audio and audiovisual recordings documenting the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian language, culture and history. Most of these recordings are wholly unique and cannot be found in other libraries, archives, or repositories...(more)

Archives at the Walter Soboleff building to be named after Native rights attorney, lawmaker
By Jennifer Canfield
KTOO
The Sealaska Heritage Institute announced today that it will name the archives facility at the Walter Soboleff Center after a Tlingit Native rights figure. William L. Paul Sr. was the state's first Alaska Native attorney and first Alaska Native legislator. He was active in fighting against school segregation, and for the citizenship rights of Natives and their right to vote...(more)

Standing tall: Guardians of the Alaska totem
By Steve Quinn
Alaska Dispatch News
T.J. Young always has an eye out for the perfect tree, particularly, but not exclusively, red cedar. The straighter the better. Once he sees it, his mind begins racing with series of questions. How tall is it? 
How wide is it? If he were to take it, on what side would he want it dropped? His older brother Joe Young has a few questions of his own. Just how big of a totem pole can he and T.J. produce from this tree? What other indigenous artwork -- a mask, a fish hook, a panel -- can the rest of the tree provide these Haida artists?...(more) (Photos)

It Takes an (Indian) Village: Massive Totem Poles Raised in Juneau [Video, Photos]
INDIAN COUNTRY TODAY
It had been a long time coming, and when Sealaska Heritage Institute finally raised the new totem poles at the Gajaa Hit building in the Indian Village at Juneau, Alaska, the assembled crowd of 500 knew they were witnessing a grand historical and artistic moment. The organization released the following details about the proceedings...(more)

Four Alaska museums receive federal grants
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Four Alaska museums have received 2014 grants by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services. Here's a look at the recipients and their projects… Sealaska Corporation, Juneau (award amount: $49,860; matching amount: $52,719): Sealaska Heritage Institute will design an exhibit that showcases Tlingit Indian clan hats to educate the public about the functions, roles, and uses of clan hats today…(more)

Photos: Work of art
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Haines artist Rob Goldberg masks a glass panel with a formline design by Northwest Coast art expert Steve Brown at the Walter Soboleff Center on Friday. Goldberg is sandblasting Brown's designs into 36 panels to be used in the building's outside canopy...(more) (Front Page View)

Amid modern building construction, Tlingit carver keeps traditional method alive
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Like most construction projects, the building site of the Walter Soboleff Center in downtown Juneau is filled with modern power tools. But if you walk to one corner of the building, Tlingit carver Wayne Price has been texturing hundreds of board feet of red cedar using just one tool – an adze. To be more precise, it's an elbow adze that Price made himself. “The blade is made from a leaf spring out of a truck and the handle is made from the branch of an alder tree and it's held together by string and a chunk of leather,” Price says...(more)

Time lapse video of totem raising online
This time-lapse video shows the installation of a screen and the raising of Eagle and Raven totem poles at Gajaa Hit in Juneau Alaska in September of 2014. The poles were carved to honor the Tlingit Auk Kwáan clans and long term residents of Indian Village. The Village Eagle and Raven clans along with Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) and the Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) sponsored the event. The totems replaced two Eagle and Raven poles at Gajaa Hit that had deteriorated to the point they posed safety issues. SHI and the Housing Authority worked closely with the Auk Kwáan and other residents of the village to identify the clan crests and oral traditions that were carved on the poles...(Video)

Gajaa Hit totem raising draws close to 500 spectators
By Scott Burton
KTOO
Close to 500 community members gathered between Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall and Gajaa Hit on Monday to celebrate the raising of a new Eagle and Raven totem poles. Brothers Joe and T.J. Young began carving the 40 foot, red cedar poles last September to replace the two poles originally carved in 1977. Between their apprentices and others, T.J. Young says it was a collaboration. “We got to talk to Nathan Jackson who is a Tlingit artist down in Ketchikan. He came in and visited us for a while and gave us some pointers, and a handful of other artists came by and wished us good luck,” T.J. Young says...(more)

Photo: Watchful bear
By Peter Metcalfe
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A black bear watches the raising of two totem poles outside of the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall on Monday. Photographer Peter Metcalfe wrote: “The bear stood there at the foot of the lawn for several minutes, ears perked and attention riveted on the drumming and chanting of the event"...(more)


Photos: Totem pole raising
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Raven totem pole is carried to the front of the Gajaa Hít building after the Eagle totem pole was set into place during a public ceremony to honor the Tlingit Auk Kwáan clans and long term residents of the Indian Village in Juneau on Monday. Carvers Joe and TJ Young of Hydaburg were on hand for the ceremony. The poles and house screen replace ones that had deteriorated to the point they posed safety issues. Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority organized the project....(more)

Community invited to Gajaa Hit pole raising
Raven, Eagle totems first to be raised downtown since 2000
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Two totem poles will be raised at the Gajaa Hit building in the Willoughby District Monday, an event that will be celebrated with a formal ceremony at 11:30 a.m. at the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall. Wooshkeetaan (shark) clan spokesman Mike Tagaban, who helped organize the Gajaa Hit pole project through Sealaska Heritage Institute, encouraged widespread attendance for the raising. “This is a positive event not just for the Auke village but for our whole community,” he said...(more)

Totems to rise today
Community invited to attend, watch webcast
Two Eagle and Raven totem poles carved to honor the Tlingit Auk Kwáan clans and long term residents of Indian Village in Juneau will be raised today, Monday, Sept. 29. The Village Eagle and Raven clans along with Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) and the Tlingit Haida Regional Housing Authority are sponsoring the ceremony, which will begin at 11:30 at the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall (formerly ANB Hall), and attendees will be invited to help carry the poles outside Gajaa Hit in Indian Village at about 12:15. We will be seeking voluntee at the event to help carry the poles. The ceremony also will be webcast live...(Watch Live) (Flyer)

Photo by Brian WallaceClimate change and crabapples
By Mary Catharine Martin
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Pacific Northwest's climate is changing, and those changes are affecting cultures closely aligned with the land. Victoria Wyllie de Echeverria, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oxford, began studying Pacific Northwest climate change through the lens of a fruit harvested by 37 Native cultures from Alaska to Oregon: the crabapple. Now, she's expanded to ecological changes on the Pacific Coast in general and is interviewing dozens of Alaska Native and Canadian First Nation elders to get a cultural, historical perspective on changes...(more) (Video)

Eagle and Raven totem poles to be raised Monday
JUNEAU EMPIRE STAFF REPORT
A public totem pole raising ceremony will be held Monday, Sept. 29, for two new poles, a Raven and an Eagle pole, created for the Gajaa Hit building in downtown Juneau. The ceremony -- hosted by Indian Village Eagle and Raven clans, Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority -- will begin at 11:30 a.m. at the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall (formerly ANB Hall) on Willoughby Avenue. “The event is open to the public and the community is welcome to attend,“ SHI President Rosita Worl said in a release. “We hope a lot of people join us to celebrate this momentous occasion.” SHI advised the community that parking will be scarce...(more)

Totems to be raised at Gajaa Hit in Juneau
Community invited to attend
Two Eagle and Raven totem poles carved to honor the Tlingit Auk Kwáan clans and long term residents of Indian Village in Juneau will be raised next week. The Village Eagle and Raven clans along with Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) and the Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority are sponsoring a totem pole raising ceremony on Monday, Sept. 29. The ceremony will begin at 11:30 at the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall (formerly ANB Hall), and attendees will be invited to help carry the poles outside Gajaa Hit in Indian Village at about 12:15. "The event is open to the public and the community is welcome to attend," said SHI President Rosita Worl. "We hope a lot of people join us to celebrate this momentous occasion"...(more) (Photos) (Flyer)

Video: How the art of adzing led to everything else
In this short video, Tlingit master artist Wayne Price talks about how once Northwest Coast Native people learned to adze, everything else followed, including clan houses, totem poles and dugout canoes. SHI has tapped Wayne to adze cedar panels for the Walter Sobolerf builing in Juneau. Photo by Brian Wallace. (Video)

Front row: Rosita Worl, Marlene Johnson, Marc Langland, Mark Copeland, Lee Kadinger; second row, Chis Swalling, Linda Thomas, Richard Lowell, Joe Beedle, Anthony Drabek; back row: David McCambridge, Ron Davis, Larry Cash and Karl Hanneman. Photo by Brian Wallace Northrim Bank makes donation to Walter Soboleff building
Northrim Bank made a major donation to the Walter Soboleff building on Wednesday. The bank presented a check for $25,000 in Juneau and released the following statement: Northrim Bank is proud to be part of the Southeast region with the recent completion of the acquisition of Alaska Pacific Bank. The Walter Soboleff Center was an ideal way to show Northrim's support of its new home. Northrim Bank is proud to support the outstanding work of Sealaska Heritage Institute and looks forward to being part of the community for many years to come. “The Soboleff Center will be a great resource for people throughout Southeast Alaska and we are proud to be part of this incredible new project,” noted Bank President and CEO Joe Beedle. A huge thank you to Northrim Bank! Caption: front row: Rosita Worl, Marlene Johnson, Marc Langland, Mark Copeland, Lee Kadinger; second row, Chis Swalling, Linda Thomas, Richard Lowell, Joe Beedle, Anthony Drabek; back row: David McCambridge, Ron Davis, Larry Cash and Karl Hanneman. Photo by Brian Wallace

Lecture on climate change now online
If you missed our lecture this week on climate change, you can now watch it online. The lecture by Victoria Wyllie de Echeverria, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oxford, focused on how climate change is being perceived by indigenous people and how these changes are affecting cultural and biological diversity in the coastal environment of northwestern North America. She was a visiting scholar at Sealaska Heritage Institute and the lecture was based on her preliminary research.…(Video)

'Dream team' of artists assembled for Soboleff Center
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Three major Northwest Coast Native art works will be permanently installed in Sealaska Heritage Institute's Walter Soboleff Center when construction is completed next year, and this week, SHI released the names of the artists who will create them. Labeled a “dream team” by SHI President Rosita Worl, the artists are Haida artist Robert Davidson, Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley and Tlingit artist Preston Singletary — three of the most highly regarded Northwest Coast Native artists working today. Through their artwork, the artists will represent the three indigenous cultures of Southeast Alaska...(more)

Photo: Panel installation
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Marvin Willard, left, and Tim Lott, of the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority, install a new panel on the side of the Gajaa Hít building in Juneau's Indian Village on Friday. The panel replaces an older worn out one along with two totems poles recently finished by brothers TJ and Joe Young. The Gajaa Hit project has been a collaboration between Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Tlingit Haida Regional Housing Authority. A pole raising ceremony has been scheduled for noon on Monday, September 29...(more)

New cultural building to showcase dramatic masterpieces by Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artists
The permanent, monumental art in a cultural center under construction in Juneau will feature master works by some of the most renowned Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artists in the world, Sealaska Heritage Institute announced today. The cedar-clad exterior of the Walter Soboleff building will feature huge, 40-foot panels designed by Haida artist Robert Davidson that will give the center a dramatic facade unlike any other structure in Southeast Alaska. Upon entering the main foyer, visitors will see an enormous carved-and-painted Tsimshian clan house front by Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley. An interior clan house space will showcase a spectacular carved glass house screen flanked by two house posts depicting Eagle and Raven warriors made by Tlingit glass artist Preston Singletary...(more)

SHI seeking archivist
Sealaska Heritage Institute is seeking an archivist to manage its Archives, Library and Collections Program. The Archivist will have primary responsibility for appraising, accessioning, processing, cataloguing, preserving and describing SHI's archival collections (manuscripts, photographs and audio and video recordings) utilizing professional archival procedures and practices. Apply for this position by submitting cover letter and resume to shijobs@sealaska.com. The cover letter should highlight your knowledge, skills, abilities and experience as they relate to key responsibilities and duties listed in the job description. The cover letter will be used as a writing sample and will be used to help determine which applicants will advance to the interview phase of the recruitment process. (Job Description)

SHI to sponsor lecture on climate change, effect on Native cultures
SHI will sponsor a noon lecture this month on climate change and its impact on Native cultures. Lecturer Victoria Wyllie de Echeverria, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oxford, will discuss how climate change is being perceived by indigenous people and how these changes are affecting cultural and biological diversity in the coastal environment of northwestern North America. Lecturer Victoria Wyllie de Echeverria, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oxford, will discuss how climate change is being perceived by indigenous people and how these changes are affecting cultural and biological diversity in the coastal environment of northwestern North America...(more)

Photo: Finishing touches
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Donald Gregory applies a sealant Tuesday to two recently finished totem poles carved and painted by brothers TJ and Joe Young. The poles are replacing weathered poles at the Gajaa Hit building on Willoughby Avenue erected in 1977 to honor the Raven and Eagle clans of the Aak'w Kwáan Tlingit. A raising ceremony is being scheduled for late September...(more)

Celebration to be rebroadcast this week
Celebration 2014 will be rebroadcast in its entirety on 360 North over four days starting Wednesday, September 10. You can watch online or on public tv (click here to see where to watch in your community in Alaska. A huge thanks to our sponsors for making it possible for SHI to fund the broadcast! Schedule: Day 1 – September 10th 3pm – 5:30pm; Day 2 – September 11th 8am – 6pm; Day 2 (cont'd) —September 11th 8pm-10:30pm; Day 3 – September 12th 8am – 6pm; Day 3 (cont'd)—September 12th 8pm-10:30pm; Day 4 – September 13th 9am – 5pm. (Schedule)

Empire Editorial: Thumbs up, thumbs down
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Thumbs up to the Annenberg Foundation. This week, it handed over a formline carved and painted wood panel to the Sealaska Heritage Institute. The panel was one of several pieces up for bid at a Paris auction house. For the past few years, the Annenberg Foundation has been helping repatriate Native art by purchasing it at foreign auctions, then giving the art to the group that created it. With so few surviving original Alaska Native artworks, it's good to see another one made available to the public instead of being locked away in a private collection...(more)

Empire Editorial: Restoring history requires many small steps
JUNEAU EMPIRE
In 1899, a group of Seattle businessmen wanted a centerpiece for Pioneer Square. They took a steamship north to the Tlingit village of Tongass, chopped down a totem pole and erected it in Seattle to the applause of a large crowd. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, tourists and businessmen treated Alaska Native culture as another resource to be extracted from the territory. Native art was exhibited at the 1876 Columbian exhibition in Philadelphia. Clan hats and regalia walked away with French visitors. Slowly, the tide that carried away so much Alaska Native heritage is starting to come back in...(more)

Sacred Native object returns home to Southeast
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Sealaska Heritage Institute president Rosita Worl flips through a printed catalog of items that were up for bid at a Paris auction house last December. She points to several Native items taken from Southeast Alaska a long time ago. “That one. This is probably from the northern area. This is another Northwest Coast piece, another Northwest Coast piece, something that should be here at home,” says Worl. “This makes me sad when I see them"...(more)

SHI gets surprise donation
Carved wooden panel first purchased at Paris auction
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Where does one find the greatest collection of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian sacred objects? The answer, unfortunately, is not in clan houses around Southeast Alaska, or even in local collections. Thanks to a generous donation by the Annenberg Foundation, one more piece has been returned home. The formline carved and painted wood panel, which may have been part of a bentwood box, was one of two Native Alaskan pieces up for bid in December 2013 at a Paris auction house. Also for auction were 27 Hopi and Apache masks and sacred objects...(more)

Two Alaska Native artifacts return home after clandestine auction bid by nonprofit
By Sean Doogan
Alaska Dispatch News
Two Alaska Native artifacts have been returned to local Native organizations after some behind-the-scenes intervention from the U.S. State Department and a clandestine buy at a European auction by a Los Angeles-based nonprofit foundation. The artifacts -- a small wooden mask believed to have been carved by members of the Chugach tribe, and part of a wooden box believed to be from the Chilkat Tlingit tribe -- were returned to Alaska in August after being purchased at a Paris auction house. Some may call it serendipity, but people from the tribes where the artifacts were originally created before they were taken away hundreds of years ago might see some spiritual guidance involved in their repatriation to Alaska...(more)

Foundation buys sacred object at Paris auction, donates to SHI
Staff stunned by turn of events
A major American foundation that anonymously purchased sacred objects during a fiercely contested auction in Paris last year has returned one of the pieces to Southeast Alaska Natives. The Annenberg Foundation is donating a Native panel to Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) that appears to be part of an old Tlingit bentwood box with a painted Chilkat design. Such a box would have held a clan's sacred objects or possibly the paraphernalia of a shaman. The news that the piece was coming home stunned staff at SHI who were familiar with the controversial auction and tried to stop it, said SHI President Rosita Worl...(more)

Dauenhauer: "Songs of vision and experience"
Community members reflect on his life and work
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Richard Dauenhauer has been described by many titles: poet, translator, scholar, linguist, anthropologist historian, editor, educator, anthologist. And in Juneau, his home since 1983, also: mentor, colleague, neighbor, friend. Community members who shared their thoughts about Dauenhauer's life and work following his Aug. 19 death went beyond those titles to describe a man who was both erudite and playful, a highly productive yet humble scholar whose work bears the imprint of two great gifts: the love of his wife, Nora Marks Dauenhauer, a Tlingit poet and his longtime collaborator; and a poetic sensibility, a keen awareness of how thought and language, language and culture, intertwine...(more)

Photo by Brian WallaceServices for Richard Dauenhauer scheduled
A Russian Orthodox service for Richard Dauenhauer will begin Thursday, August 28, 2014, at 10:00 AM at St. Paul's Catholic Church, with open casket beginning at 9:00 AM. The Russian Orthodox blessing of the plot and burial will follow the service at Alaska Memorial Park. Since Richard was adopted by his father-in-law Willie Marks, into the Chookaneidí Clan, Brown Bear House, Hoonah, the Celebration of his life and contributions to Alaska will be held in Juneau on Saturday, August 30, 2014, at 1:00 PM, at Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall, 320 W. Willoughby Avenue. (Obituary)

Richard Dauenhauer dies at 72: Scholar of Tlingit language, culture
By Jill Leovy
Los Angeles Times
A fish doesn't jump in Tlingit, the native language of indigenous people of Southeast Alaska. It performs a feat no word in English can adequately express. The verb in Tlingit captures the instant when a fish breaks the surface, the sequence of sounds as it rises and the spray of water that spreads around it. That some modern-day Alaskans get frustrated as they search for English equivalents can be attributed in part to the work of Richard Dauenhauer, a linguist, anthropologist, playwright and former Alaska poet laureate who died Tuesday of cancer in Juneau, Alaska...(more)

A partnership of language and love
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Dick Dauenhauer was teaching folklore at Alaska Methodist University in the early 1970s when he met student Nora Marks. Her friend Rosita Worl, now president of Sealaska Heritage Institute, was also a student. “Her and Dick just hit it off. I think they had the same kind of sense of humor as I recall. And that was when their work started,” Worl says. Dauenhauer and Marks married on November 28, 1973. She was 15 years older. “They became quite a team. He had the technical knowledge of languages and stories and he was an educator, and she had all the traditional knowledge of Tlingit and it was a great combination,” Worl says...(more)

SHI seeks retail manager
Sealaska Heritage Institute is seeking a person to manage and operate Sealaska Heritage Institute's retail store. The candidate must have knowledge of Northwest Coast culture and art, a college degree or demonstrated retail management experience and five years of retail experience or equivalent. Apply for this position by submitting cover letter and resume to shijobs@sealaska.com. (Position Description)

Photo by Brian WallaceRichard Dauenhauer Walks Into The Forest
We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Richard Dauenhauer. He, along with his beloved wife Nora (Keixnei), produced some of the most important books on Tlingit culture, history and language of our time. His contributions to Tlingit culture are immeasurable. We are deeply saddened despite knowing that we and future generations benefit from his decades of dedicated scholarly work that he pursued with Nora. He brought to life the words and wisdom of our ancestors that otherwise might have passed into oblivion but for his persistence in collecting the stories and his ability to transcribe, translate and publish the oral traditions of our ancestors. We mourn the loss of a great person. But we are thankful that he came into our lives and culture.

Poet, translator Richard Dauenhauer dies at 72
Poet, Tlingit translator Richard Dauenhauer dies of cancer
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Southeast Alaska lost a poet, a translator, a scholar, a former poet laureate and a historian on Tuesday. Richard “Dick” Dauenhauer was all of these things and more in his lifetime, which ended after a battle with cancer. Dauenhauer was born in 1942 in Syracuse, N.Y., though he called Alaska home after moving to the state in the late 1960s. He married into and became an expert on the Tlingit nation of Southeast Alaska. He met his wife, Nora Marks Dauenhauer, at Alaska Methodist University in the mid-1970s. She is celebrated for many of the same contributions — the two often worked together...(more

Indian Village totem poles come down
By Jeremy Hsieh
KTOO
The two totem poles that stood for 36 years in Juneau's old Indian Village have been hauled off. A work crew with a 12-ton boom truck pulled the delicate poles and hauled them to a warehouse Tuesday. They had deteriorated badly over the years, but were taken away more or less intact. Ricardo Worl is the president and CEO of The Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority, which owns the Gajaa Hít building where the totem poles stood...(more)

Kooch'eit'aa: Teaching the Tlingit language through basketball
By Casey Kelly
KTOO
On the basketball court at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau, a dozen middle and high school students warm up for their first day of camp. As they stretch near half court, Jessica Chester counts to 10 in Tlingit: “Tléix', déix, nás'k, daax'oon, keijín, tleidooshú, daxadooshú, nas'gadooshú, gooshúk, jinkaat.” Chester teaches Alaska Native languages for the Juneau School District. She's been helping out with Sealaska Heritage Institute's summer basketball camps since 2006. She says all of the drills incorporate at least some Tlingit...(more)

Education Program Assistant
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) is seeking a program assistant for its Education Department. This employee will report to the education director. Duties will include assisting the director in management of all aspects of the department's projects and activities, coordinating and implementing activities such as programs for youth, maintaining statistical data, providing regular communication with the public about programs, and providing support in program development. Three years of professional work and college degree in education or related field required. To apply, send a resume to Administrative Director Sarah Dybdahl at sarah.dybdahl@sealaska.com or 907.586.9234. (Job Description)

New Eagle and Raven totem poles to rise this month
By Jeremy Hsieh
KTOO
Haida carving brothers Joe and T.J. Young are back in Juneau to finish a pair of Eagle and Raven totem poles. About this time last year, the Hydaburg men and their apprentices were using axes and chainsaws to shape the red cedar logs. Friday, they were working with small hand tools. “As you work your way, as you start roughing it out, you'll start getting — the tools'll get smaller and smaller and smaller,” says T.J. Young. “And you'll do a lot more sharpening throughout the process.” Sealaska Heritage Institute commissioned the new poles to replace the deteriorating, 36-year-old ones in front of the Gajaa Hít building off Willoughby Avenue...(more)

Dr. Walter Soboleff Day bill signed into law
By Casey Kelly
KTOO
Gov. Sean Parnell has signed legislation making Nov. 14 Dr. Walter Soboleff Day in Alaska. About 100 of the late Tlingit elder's family and friends gathered at Juneau's Marine Park for the bill signing ceremony on Wednesday, where Soboleff was remembered as a man who spread love and good will to all Alaskans. The idea for a day honoring Soboleff first took off at the 2012 Alaska Native Brotherhood and Sisterhood Grand Camp convention. “We were in Sitka at our 100th anniversary,” said Peter Naoroz, ANB's 2nd Grand Vice President...(more)

Behind the camera
Researchers explore legacy left by Japanese-American photographer Seiki Kayamori
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
When Japanese-American photographer Seiki Kayamori died in 1941, he left behind a view of Yakutat and its residents that offers an intimate, surprisingly extensive visual record of the community he called home for nearly 30 years. One thing that's lacking, however, is Kayamori's own presence. Although his collection includes more than 700 images, only a few of the photographer are known to exist. Until recently, information about the photographer has also been scarce, existing for the most part in the memories and conversations of Yakutat residents, who have long valued the contributions Kayamori made to their personal and collective history...(more)

Young seeks resolution for traditional Alaska Native artwork containing bird parts
In a House Natural Resources Subcommittee hearing today, Alaskan Congressman Don Young questioned Fish and Wildlife Service Deputy Director Steven Guertin on legislation he introduced to address the sale of Alaska Native artwork containing non-edible migratory bird parts.“For thousands of years, the inclusion of bones, feathers, and other non-edible bird parts in traditional handicrafts has been commonplace in the Alaska Native culture,” said Congressman Don Young. “However, an issue came to light a couple of years ago when a widely celebrated Tlingit artist was cited by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for including feathers in a piece he offered for sale. While he could have served jail time or received a hefty fine, he ultimately settled with the Service for a —still significant— couple thousand dollars"...(more) (Video of Young/Guertin Exchange) (Background) (Sealaska Press Release)

Worl presents on Southeast Native people's involvement in DNA studies
SHI President Rosita Worl participated in a panel discussion on Native peoples and genetic research in June at the National Museum of the American Indian. In this video, she speaks on "Haa Shuka and Haa Latseen: Knowledge of Our Ancestors" and gives an overview of three cases in which Native people in Southeast Alaska have participated in DNA studies. (Rosita Worl Presentation) (All Videos)

SHI aims to rebuild stocks to culturally, archaeologically indicated levels at historical locations
By Mary Catharine Martin
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Archaeological records and cultural memory indicate that in addition to being more abundant in Southeast Alaska, herring spawning locations were once more consistent. Though the Alaska Department of Fish and Game says its data don't support either conclusion, a new program at the Sealaska Heritage Institute intends to restore herring to areas where they proliferated...(more)

Alaska museums awarded grants for exhibits, training
By Heather Bryant
KTOO
Three Alaska groups have received more than $142,000 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The money will go toward a Tlingit clan hat exhibit in Juneau, the Whale House exhibit in Haines and a training workshop for small museums. The grant supports Native American and Native Hawaiian museum projects. Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl says their grant will go toward the costs of an exhibit on the history and significance of Tlingit clan hats...(more)

Summer books roundup
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
It's an exciting time to be a book lover in Alaska — the literary scene across the state seems to get better every year, with books by and about Alaskans released faster than most readers can possibly keep up with them. If you have a long flight or ferry ride planned for the coming weeks as part of a summer vacation, take advantage of the opportunity to check out what your fellow Alaskans have been up to. Here's a sampling of titles to get you started...(more) (Buy Killer Whale Eyes)

SHI now on AmazonSmile
If you ever shop at Amazon.com please consider signing up for their AmazonSmile program. SHI is now registered for the program and Amazon will donate .5% of the price of your purchases to SHI whenever you shop on AmazonSmile. The donation will not change the total cost of your purchase. And, AmazonSmile is the same Amazon you know--same products, same prices, same service. Simply sign up here the next time you go to the site, and it will save that setting for all of your future shopping. Please help spread the word! http://smile.amazon.com/ch/92-0081844

Herring search spans millennia
By Mary Catharine Martin
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Southeast Alaska's Pacific herring populations seem to be on the rebound, but even in fisheries regarded as healthy, some contend herring are significantly depleted from historical levels indicated by archaeological records and cultural memory. Herring have long been used by Tlingit, Haida and other Native peoples, who harvested eggs on kelp or hemlock branches hung in the water during a spawn, or gathered the fish themselves for meat, oil and bait. The commercial fishery wasn't managed like it is today until industrial fishing had been underway for decades...(more)

SHI to sponsor basketball camp
SHI will sponsor its annual Latseen Hoop Camp in Juneau this year. This is an innovative program designed to integrate the Tlingit language into an intensive week of basketball camp. The program creates a fun and supportive learning environment for you to develop your basketball skills and fundamentals while also learning your language. The camp is for students in grades 5-12 and is scheduled Aug. 4-8, 10am-4:30 at the University of Alaska Southeast Rec Center. To apply, submit an application to Michael Hoyt, michael.hoyt@sealaska.com, 907.586.9166. (Application) (Flyer)

Hands-on learning
Carving project highlights modern aspects of apprenticeship tradition
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
When Haida carvers Joe and TJ Young were teenagers in Hydaburg 20 years ago, apprenticeship opportunities there were scarce. To learn the basics of carving and design, they built on carpentry skills learned in high school and cultural knowledge passed on from their grandfather, Claude Morrison. The rest they picked up wherever they could. “Most recently, I apprenticed with Robert Davidson, but before that we kind of did a lot of it on our own,” TJ Young said. “We never really got to apprentice under anyone. It would have been nice. It was trial and error for a long time, but we're starting to understand a few things and learn from our mistakes"...(more)

Math and Culture Academy wraps
Farewell to our Math and Culture Academy students, who leave for home today. They came to Juneau from Angoon, Hoonah, Klukwan and Hydaburg to learn math through culture. They also learned Native languages through our basketball camp. They were a fantastic group of kids! Photo by Brian Wallace. Funded through a grant from the Alaska Native Education Program.

Annual Report now available
SHI's annual report showing highlights of programs in 2013 is now available. Read a .pdf online or request a hard copy from Kathy Dye at kathy.dye@sealaska.com. This year's edition includes QR codes to play videos about our programs on your smart phone. You can also watch a video, which shows some highlights from 2013. The year 2013 was a significant year for SHI, as we broke ground on the Walter Soboleff Center in Juneau! Thanks to everyone who made 2013 a great year! (.pdf) (Video)

Celebration thank you from SHI
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Thank you to everyone who helped to make Celebration 2014 happen. It was one of our best Celebrations ever and on behalf of Sealaska Heritage Institute, I thank the following people, organizations and businesses who helped make it come together: Sponsors: Copper ($10,000 and up): Sealaska, City and Borough of Juneau; Platinum ($5,000 - 9,999): Alaska Airlines, BP Alaska, Carla Kleefeld and Celeste Worl, Managed Business Solutions, LLC; Gold...(more)

Wells Fargo gives $50,000 for Walter Soboleff Center
A HUGE thank you to Wells Fargo, which donated $50,000 to SHI for the Walter Soboleff Center during Celebration 2014. The check was presented by Darren Franz, Alaska Regional Business Banking Manager for Wells Fargo. Also, many thanks to Rod Worl and Dawn Dinwoodie, who gave a $25,000 donation during Celebration! For a complete list of everyone who made donations to the center during Celebration click here. (Photo by Brian Wallace)

Master carver urges young artists to do their formline 'homework'
Wayne Price, winner of five awards in SHI's Juried Art Show last week, reminds students to look to the past
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Editor's note: This story has been updated to correct a reporting error regarding Wayne Price's clan affiliation. Price is a member of the Shark House in Kake. Tlingit carver Wayne Price has a message for Southeast Alaska's Northwest Coast artists: Hold yourselves to the same standard of excellence that your ancestors did. “Long ago our ancestors had a real high artistic standard, and it's always been my goal as an artist to maintain that high standard,” Price said Wednesday...(more)

SHI raises Soboleff Center funds during Celebration
By Casey Kelly
KTOO
Sealaska Heritage Institute raised more than $75,000 last week during Celebration for the Walter Soboleff Center under construction in downtown Juneau. The nonprofit is about $2 million short of the $20 million it needs to pay for the building, which will house the institute's offices and collections. It also will feature space for SHI's language program, art exhibits and an artist-in-residence program. The 29,000 square foot facility is expected to open by early 2015. “This will help Juneau become the new Northwest coast art capital of the world,” said Sealaska Corp. board chair Albert Kookesh, who led a fundraising pitch from the Celebration stage on Saturday...(more)

Weaving a journey of change
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
In early 2011, Della Cheney started weaving a Ravenstail robe for her daughter in honor of her doctoral degree. She had weaved about a quarter of it, when she began to feel not right. “I knew something was wrong but I didn't know, so I went to get my yearly test and they found something abnormal,” Cheney says. She was diagnosed with endometrial cancer. She stopped weaving and had to have surgery and chemotherapy. A year later, Cheney went back to the robe and started over. This meant undoing 14 inches of weaving, more than a year's worth of work...(more)

$75K raised for Soboleff Center during Celebration
JUNEAU EMPIRE
More than $75,000 was raised during Sealaska Heritage Institute's Celebration 2014 for the Walter Soboleff Center, the Sealaska cultural center under construction downtown. The money will go toward the facility's construction, Sealaska board chairman Albert Kookesh said in a news release. “The center will house the activities for the Sealaska Heritage Institute and perpetuate our heritage into the future,” he said...(more)

Weaving a new Native narrative in museums
Portland Art Museum presenting Native art,voices
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Who is the Indian in the museum? “The narrative ... is crafted largely by the museum, and not the Native communities,” Portland Art Museum Curator of Native American Art Deana Dartt said. Dartt is hoping to change how the Native story is told — and she thinks the Portland Art Museum is ready to do it. “I'm native, coastal Chumash from Santa Barbara,” Dartt said. “I've always been interested in our art forms and our history and how museums represent us.” She said she grew up in a place, Los Angeles, where “Indians are invisible"...(more)

Regalia button business becomes a family affair
Button Man trains Button Boy to take over family business
By Rebecca Salsman
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Small businesses often make people think of mom and pop shops passed down from one generation to the next. For lifelong Juneau resident Gary Waid, his story is a little different. When Alaska Native culture, particularly Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian, was “coming back to life” through a cultural revival, Waid began searching Ebay for regalia buttons. He collected mother of pearl buttons from the National Button Society and people's old filing cabinets until he established his business 15 years ago, which has become a niche in the Native community...(more)

Jubilation Incarnate: Watch Sealaska's Celebration 2014 honor Alaska Native heritage
INDIAN COUNTRY TODAY
The crowd of 2,000 danced, jingled and drummed their way to Juneau's Centennial Hall Wednesday evening for Celebration 2014. And that was just the dancers. It was a Grand Entrance to beat all Grand Entrances, as thousands thronged to see the 50 dance troupes jump start the biennial festival known as Celebration on June 11. The processional was led by Saanya Kwaan, the Cape Fox dancers, and by now the Sealaska's biennial Celebration is in full tilt...(more)

Whale House lecture now online
If you missed the lecture "Chief Son-i-Hat Whale House Restoration and Preservation Project," it's now available on Vimeo and YouTube online. The lecture was given by Richard Peterson, president of Tlingit and Haida Central Council, and Frederick Olsen, Jr., vice president of the Organized Village of Kasaan on restoring the oldest Haida structure in the world...(more) (Vimeo) (YouTube)

Saanya Kwáan takes center role in Celebration 2014
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Harvey Shields remembers attending the first Celebration in 1982 as a member of the Saanya Kwáan (Cape Fox) Dancers, led by his mother, Martha Shields. More than three decades later, he's here to lead Saanya Kwáan with his sister, Sarah Abbot, as official hosts of Celebration 2014. Shields said the group has been preparing since Celebration 2012, when their role as hosts was announced by Sealaska Heritage Institute. “When we learned we'd be the host for this year, we started our fundraisers to get as many dancers as we could,” he said. “Our dancers are in Anchorage, in Juneau, in Seattle, as far away as Virginia and some in California. So we include them in on this if they can make it"...(more)

Celebration Photos
The Washington Post sent a team to Juneau to cover Celebration 2014. Check out this photo album by photojournalist Linda Davidson...(more)

Lecture cancelled
SHI's lecture by Dr. Thomas Thornton on alpine stone refuges and other rock cairn features in Southeast Alaska has been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances. Please join us at 3:00, Friday, at the Goldbelt Chilkat Room for our final lecture given by Richard J. Peterson and Frederick Olsen on the Whale House restoration and preservation project.

Sealaska Heritage seeks to be the hub of Northwest Coast art
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Sealaska Heritage Institute's biennial Juried Art Show and Competition is raising the bar for Native artists in Southeast Alaska. This year's juror David Robert Boxley says the competition creates an environment for artists to constantly keep striving...David Robert Boxley says it was agonizing to pick the 10 winners of the seventh Juried Art Show and Competition from the roughly 30 pieces submitted. “The winners were chosen in a way that I hope will show what's possible,” he says. Boxley is a Tsimshian artist from Metlakatla and the son of prominent carver David Boxley. His father just finished his 72nd totem pole. David R. Boxley started carving when he was six, learning from his father. He says Sealaska Heritage Institute's competition pushes the standard of art being made in Southeast Alaska...(more)

Interactive map visualizes Tlingit connection to land
Taku River Tlingit names, stories and more on new interactive map
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
One cannot separate Tlingit history from the land, and it's never been easier to understand why, with a collaboration between the Taku River Tlingit First Nation and the University of British Columbia. During Celebration on Thursday afternoon, Nicole Gordon, of the Taku River Tlingit First Nation of Atlin, and Christine Schreyer, assistant professor of anthropology at UBC-Okanagan, presented “Demonstration of Taku River Tlingit First Nation Place Names Map and Website.” The lecture provided background information about the creation of the interactive map and a tutorial on its use...(more)

Photos: Thursday Celebration
By Michael Penn
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Photos from Thursday's Celebration events...(more)

Raven stories lecture now online
If you missed the lecture by Richard and Nora Marks Dauenhauer on Raven stories you can now watch it online on Vimeo and YouTube. Their book on Raven stories is projected to be volume 5 of their "Classics of Tlingit Oral Literature" to be co-published by Sealaska Heritage Institute. (Vimeo) (YouTube)

Click to watch show on VimeoJuried Art Show awards ceremony now online!
If you missed our awards ceremony on Wednesday, you can now watch it online on Vimeo and YouTube. See the incredible pieces that took top prizes. Special thanks to our juror, David R. Boxley, who chose six artists for awards in three categories and best of show in SHI's seventh Juried Art Show and Competition. (Vimeo) (YouTube)

Sealaska Southeast "Celebration" photo gallery
By Rick Boots
KTVA-TV
The biennial “Celebration” – put on by Sealaska – kicked off Wednesday in Juneau. Events celebrating the arts, culture, language and history of the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people continue through Saturday...(more)

Tlingit carver Wayne Price takes top honor at Celebration art show
By Lisa Phu
KTOO
Tlingit carver and artist Wayne Price of Haines took Best of Show in the Sealaska Heritage Institute's seventh Juried Art Show and Competition. Price's ‘Dancing Raven Hat' is a painted hat made of red cedar and otter fur. The piece also took third place in the Formline Art category. Price's other works – ‘Quantum Raven' Paddle and ‘Mother Whale' Paddle took first and second places in Formline, the show's newest category. Here are the complete results...(more)

2,000 dancers make a Grand Entrance to Celebration
By Rosemarie Alexander
KTOO
The biennial festival is the largest cultural event in the state. Organized by Sealaska Heritage Institute, it brings multiple generations of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people together to celebrate their culture. The Saanya Kwaan, Cape Fox dancers, were chosen to lead the processional of 50 dance groups in the Grand Entrance. Harvey Shields is the leader of the Chief welcome dance....(more)

Juried Art Show recognizes exemplary works
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
In introducing the winners of Sealaska Heritage Institute's seventh biennial Juried Art Show and Competition Wednesday evening, juror and Tsimshian artist David R. Boxley took a few moments to express his great passion for Northwest Coast Art. “The true beauty of Northwest Coast Art is its great complexity, which is often mistaken for elegant simplicity,” he said. “It isn't simple. The two-dimensional, sculptural and woven work of our ancestors is as sophisticated as any great art form in the history of the world"...(more)

Photos: Celebration
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Sealaska Heritage Institute 2014 Celebration officially kicked of Wednesday in Juneau. Many gathered for the unofficial start of the event at Sandy Beach, to welcome canoes from various Southeast Alaska communities. Later, in downtown Juneau, the event officially kicked off with the Grand Entrance parade into Centennial Hall...(more)

Winners of Juried Art Competition announced
Six artists have taken top awards at Sealaska Heritage Institute's seventh Juried Art Show and Competition in Juneau. The winners, chosen by juror David Boxley, a prominent Tsimshian artist, are: Best of Show, Wayne Price—Dancing Raven Hat; 1st place Northwest Coast Customary Art, Pauline Duncan—Ravenstail Set...(more)

Killer Whale Eyes
By Emily Russo Miller
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Haida author pens her first children's book: Story telling, booksigning to take place during Celebration
As a little girl, Sondra Simone Segundo spent her summers in Hydaburg where her grandmother and great-grandmother lived. There, she heard Haida stories passed down from generation to generation about her ancestors. One story struck her in particular. Her uncle regaled her with the tale about a family member who 500 years ago left home to work for the settlers who came to Southeast Alaska. His family was fearful, as many others had gone and never returned...(more)

All Nations Children's dance group fosters cultural identity
By Scott Burton
KTOO
Celebration begins this evening at 6 o'clock with the Grand Entrance procession to Centennial Hall. The four-day cultural event of Southeast Alaska Natives includes 50 dance groups. Among them is All Nations Children's Dance Group of Juneau. The group formed in 1995 and has about 80 members. I attended a recent practice and learned that singing and dancing is a foundation for much more...(more)

More than dance
Jameses teach history, culture through movement and song
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The floorboards of Lyle and Kolene James' living room vibrated to the rhythm of drum-beats and the foot-falls of more than 40 Woosh.ji.een dancers Sunday afternoon during a high-energy rehearsal for Celebration, Sealaska Heritage Institute's biennial dance and cultural festival. With their performances only days away, there was much to be done...(more) (Celebration 2014 Special Section)

Sealaska Heritage Institute releases children's book
Author to do book signing, storytelling during Celebration
SHI has published a children's book inspired by Haida stories in an effort to increase the volume of materials available to teach Southeast Alaska Native culture to young people. Killer Whale Eyes was written and illustrated by Sondra Simone Segundo of the Raven Clan, Double Fin Killer Whale Crest, Brown Bear House. Segundo, whose maternal grandparents are Haida from Southeast Alaska, created the tale, which was inspired by Native beliefs and Haida stories that were passed down over the years. She dedicated Killer Whale Eyes to her uncle, Miijuu (the late Claude Morrison, a well-known fluent Haida speaker), and her aunt, Viola Burgess, both of whom helped translate some words to Haida. She also dedicated it to her aunt Louise (Morrison) Arrington, who supported her work on the book...(more) (Buy) (News Article)

Traditional foods with a modern twist
By Rebecca Salsman
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Historically, soapberry dishes were made at ceremonial gatherings and considered an uncommon treat. Thanks to the biennial event Celebration, people have the chance to make and taste the dish this week. Starting as small green and red dots, the soapberries will grow into large frothy desserts at 3 p.m. Thursday at the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council. Like popular Food Network shows, the dishes will be made in front of a live audience and the winners will receive a cash prize of $500, $250 or $100. Participants can also submit seaweed dishes for the other Traditional Food Contest, which will be judged at 7 p.m. Thursday at the JACC...(more)

Celebration to kick off next week
SHI will kick off its biennial Celebration next week, marking the 32nd year since the inception of the popular dance-and-culture festival. Celebration is a major event organized by Sealaska Heritage Institute every two years. First held in 1982, it has become the largest cultural event in the state, drawing thousands of people to the capital. It's a time when Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people come together to celebrate their survival as a culture, said SHI President Rosita Worl, adding it's also a community event open to the general public. "Everyone is welcome at Celebration. We hope that non-Native people will attend our event. We want people to come and learn and celebrate our culture," Worl said...(more) (Schedule) (Venues Map)

Volunteer orientation scheduled for Thursday
There will be a brief orientation for Celebration volunteers at 6:00 pm, Thursday, June 5th, Centennial Hall, Egan Room. We'll be discussing some of the aspects of volunteering including: roles, expectations, passes, when and where to check in during celebration, what to do in emergencies, and what to do when conflicts arise. If you know anyone who is interested in volunteering, but hasn't signed up, encourage them to show up for this meeting, or to contact volunteer coordinator Mike Hoyt at michael.hoyt@sealaska.com or 586-9166.

SHI to unveil pieces accepted for Juried Art Show
Awards to be announced next week
SHI will open its seventh, biennial Juried Art Show on Friday and announce the winners next week at the start of Celebration 2014. The show will open on June 6, during First Friday at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center (JACC) and run through June 28. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony scheduled 4pm, Wednesday, July 11 at the JACC. Winners will receive prizes in the following categories...(more)

SHI receives national award for archives, library
SHI is one of eight organizations to receive a national award for archives institutional excellence. The award, which recognizes SHI Archivist and Collections Manager Zach Jones (pictured), was announced today by the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums, which said in part:“The development of the SHI Library, Archives, and Collections Program has followed a careful and deliberate path from a site-based repository to a priceless resource of rare books, photographs, recordings, and manuscripts accessible online from anywhere in the world. Creating partnerships with local, national, and international organizations, SHI has ensured that collections donated to the archive encompassing Tlingit oral histories, Alaska Native Brotherhood have been processed and made accessible employing the highest professional standards.Exemplary is the current project to reveal the hidden treasures in their Tlingit language recordings by migrating cassette tapes to digital format and employing native speakers who listen and record metadata about the oral history and traditional ecological knowledge contained therein"...(more)

SHI seeking EMTs for Celebration 2014
Sealaska Heritage Institute seeks to have EMTs present at Celebration 2014, located in Centennial Hall, Juneau, Alaska from June 12 to 14, 2014. EMTs will be stationed at a public table and make themselves available to assist with any emergency medical needs. Proposal Submission: Interested applicants should submit their resume and a one-page cover letter explaining their experience and interest in working for Sealaska Heritage Institute. Applications can be delivered in person at Sealaska's offices to Zachary R. Jones or sent via email to zachary.jones@sealaska.com. For questions call 907-586-9261...(more)

Celebration 2014 Grand Entrance
Grand Entrance will take place at 6pm, Wednesday, June 11 (instead of Thursday morning). Dancers need to line up at 4:30 at the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall. Please help spread the word.

A Juneau Afternoon
By Shona Strauser
KTOO-FM
A conversation with SHI's Sarah Dybdahl and Lee Kadinger on Celebration 2014 and the Walter Soboleff Center...(more) (Starts at 29:35)

Soboleff Center takes shape
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The Walter Soboleff Center has quickly taken shape on the corner of Front and Seward Streets downtown, filling in the space once known as “the Pit” with a three-story, contemporary building designed to serve as a Northwest Coast cultural center for Sealaska Heritage Institute. Following the recent addition of 40-foot yellow cedar panels and large stretches of glass, the structure now looks fairly complete from the outside, less than 10 months after a groundbreaking ceremony was held on the empty lot where the center now stands. Massive cedar beams above the entrances are reminiscent of the roofline of a traditional clan house, hinting at the building's function as a Native art and culture center. And there's much more to come, including exterior artwork that will be an unmistakable signal to visitors that the center's purpose and contents are unique to Southeast Alaska...(more)

Tlingit clan hat sells for $365,000
Southeast organizers raised more than $26k for failed bid
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Despite the efforts of the organizers and many supporters, a Tlingit clan hat up for auction will not return to its home in Wrangell — at least not yet. It was with disappointment, but not despair, that Mike Aak'wtaatseen Hoyt announced on the Facebook page, “Help Return A Sacred Tlingit Clan Hat Up For Auction,” that the Kiks.ádi clan hat Southeast Alaska residents tried to procure sold at Sotheby's for $365,000. “This isn't the end of the story. Sotheby's doesn't get to decide that,” Hoyt wrote. “As long as we hear the hat calling to us to come home, and we keep calling to it in our words and actions, we'll keep moving forward to that moment of return"...(more)

Natives rallying to rescue sacred Tlingit hat from auction
Indian Country Today
Today, May 21, at 2:30 PM eastern, Sotheby's will auction a number of Native American items in a sale titled "Arts of the American West," and a concerned group of Alaska Natives is working against the clock to return Lot 88 to its owners. The item is listed as "Rare Northwest Coast Polychromed Wood Clan Hat, Tsimshian or Tlingit," andthe description at Sothebys.comis pretty straightforward, concentrating on the materials and craftsmanship. No details of the hat's provenance or meaning are provided. A page created to at GoFundMe.com that seeks donations to buy the hat is more informative. It's identified as "a sacred Tlingit clan hat of the Wrangell Kiks.ádi clan"...(more)

Reviving Tlingit language
By KCAW News
Sealaska Heritage Institute's Tlingit Mentor Apprentice Program is designed to increase the number of fluent speakers under the age of 60. Program coordinator Jasmine James discusses how it works...(more)

SHI hires new art director
SHI has hired a new art director to manage and expand its art programs as the institute prepares to open the Walter Soboleff Center in Juneau next year. SHI hired Kari Groven, a well-known fixture in the Juneau arts community who has been instrumental in developing the Juneau Arts and Culture Center (JACC) into one of the town's most vibrant art hubs. The institute was searching for a candidate with very specific skills, and Kari was a near perfect match for the position, said SHI President Rosita Worl...(more)

When auction house looks to Tlingit art, the sacred goes on sale
Many in Southeast work to purchase clan hat to return it to its rightful home
By Melissa Griffiths
JUNEAU EMPIRE
There are stories of wars fought over hats, Harold Jacobs said. Not just any hats — Tlingit clan hats carry the weight of history, the voices of ancestors and significance beyond what is easily fathomed in Western culture. Jacobs, Cultural Resource Specialist with Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, saw that a Tlingit hat would be on Sotheby's New York auction block May 21. With not even a week until the auction, he and others with an interest in seeing the hat returned to its owners, thought to be the Kiks.ádi clan of Wrangell, are taking action. With several objects of Tlingit, Haida or Tsimshian origin featured in the Sotheby's auction, it is important to understand why this hat has garnered the attention it has from people in the Tlingit community. “Hats are the most important object any clan can have,” Jacobs said. He brought up the Tlingit concept of Haa Shagoon, which is defined as recognizing the bonds between our ancestors, current generation and future generations, according to a glossary on the Sealaska Heritage Institute site. “This hat represents the clan,” Sealaska Heritage Institute Director Rosita Worl said..(more)

The Dauenhauers teach tour guides how to teach tourists
By Emily Forman
KCAW
Two of greatest living scholars on Sitka's Russian and Tlingit past were in Sitka last week to train National Park rangers on the historic battles that took place here. Park rangers give programs, of course, but sometimes they'll interact with visitors for only a few minutes at a time. So the challenge is: How do you teach visitors about the culture in a way that will have impact – when the most commonly-asked question is “Where's the bathroom?” I'm on a bus tour. All the passengers are trained historical interpreters. And the tour guides are the leading scholars on the topic. They literally wrote the book. Dick: One of the earliest recordings of the history is from Sally Hopkins. And her daughter asked Nora if she would transcribe and translate this…Nora and Dick Dauenhauer are the author's of Russians in Tlingit America – the definitive work on the battles of 1802 and 1804...(more)

Application deadline extended for the 2014 Math and Culture Academy!
SHI is currently accepting applications for our 2014 Math and Culture Academy. This academy will bring together 50 middle school students from Angoon, Hoonah, Klukwan, Hydaburg and Juneau for 10 days to enhance their math skills through traditional cultural ways of knowing. The academy will be held at the University of Alaska Southeast from June 20 to July 1, 2014. Travel, food, and accommodations will be provided at no cost to the participants. All students will stay on campus with chaperones. If a school district employee or parent is interested in being a chaperone please let us know. Please share information with your middle schools students about the Summer Math and Culture Academy. To register for the academy students need to submit an application packet by April 30, 2014. Packets can be emailed, mailed or faxed to Rachael DeMarce, rachael.demarce@sealaska.com; fax: 907.586.9293; mail: One Sealaska Plaza, Suite 301, Juneau, AK 99801. (Flyer) (Registration Packet)

Tlingit clans bring back traditional memorial ceremonies to Wrangell
By Rosita Worl
FOR THE JUNEAU EMPIRE
Recently, for the first time in many decades, Tlingit clans in Wrangell held a ku.éex' (memorial ceremony). These ancient ceremonies, which are still practiced by clans regionwide, were almost stamped out of Wrangell after U.S. military strikes there in the 1800s and a long period of cultural suppression. But on April 26, the ku.éex' returned. It was truly an historic event. I was honored to attend the Kiks.ádi and the Teeyhíttaan ku.éex', during which Richard Rinehart Jr., and Michael John Hoyt were appointed and validated as Sháade háni (clan leaders) of their respective clans. Richard also received the name of Tashee, which was held by former clan leader Herb Bradley...(more)

SHI seeking educators, artists for Jinéit Art Academy
SHI still has some spots available for artists and educators who want to participate in our Jinéit Art Academy. We're seeking an artist from Angoon, an educator from Craig, and artist/educator teams from Ketchikan, Sitka, Hydaburg and Haines. Educators may be certified teachers, para educators, para professionals, special-ed assistants, Indian studies staff, and classroom/teacher assistants. Educators will learn to teach Northwest Coast formline art and Native artists will learn to teach design. The academy will be June 2-6 in Juneau. Travel and lodging provided by SHI. To apply, contact Shaa at shaa@sealaska.com or 907.586.9129…(more) (Flyer) (Teacher Application) (Artist Application)

Compete for top prizes in SHI's traditional food contests
Applications are now available for people who want to compete in our traditional food contests during Celebration 2014. SHI will sponsor a soapberry contest and a black seaweed contest during the event, scheduled June 11-14 in Juneau. Top three winners will receive prizes of $500, $250 and $100. For more information, contact Contest Coordinator Jasmine James, jasmine.james@sealaska.com or 907.586.9264. (Seaweed Contest Application) (Soapberry Contest Application)

Project to restore herring, starting with Sitka
By Emily Forman
KCAW
Before statehood and the advent of scientific management, Southeast Alaska's herring populations were harvested — and depleted — without much thought for the future. Herring reduction plants were numerous in the region in the early twentieth century, but the industry was short-lived. Many believe the herring population in Sitka Sound now is a fraction of what it was in those days, and wonder if herring stocks — like salmon — can be restored. A recent grant intends to launch that effort. Just look at Raven Radio's Facebook page. Photos of active herring spawn in Sitka Sound and hemlock branches coated with eggs are the kind of posts that go viral. It's clear that many more than the 9,000 people that live in Sitka are herring obsessed. “Culturally it's important obviously as a major subsistence resource in the Sitka area but also very important in trade,” says Chuck Smythe, the Director of the history and culture department at Sealaska Heritage Institute...(more)

Remaining Tlingit items at Yale cause uproar
By Christina Rose
INDIAN COUNTRY TODAY
When stories of stolen Tlingit objects at the Yale Peabody Natural History Museum hit the press this week, museum officials came under fire. Yale was not alone in having these kinds of items in their collection. In 1899, the Harriman Expedition, loaded with scientists, artists, and collectors ransacked an Alaskan Tlingit village, abandoned following a small pox epidemic. They brought the items back and distributed them to museums all over the country...(more)

Staying connected with Native culture
KTUU-TV
Today was the final day of a four day skin sewing workshop at the Alaska Native Heritage Center. Participants learned to stretch hides, cut patterns and hand sew hats and scarves made out of fur. It was put on by the Sealaska Heritage Institute as part of its Southeast Alaska Sustainable Arts project. One participant said she sewed as a kid and enjoyed making moccasins, scarves and hats with her grandmother…(more) (at the 04:45 mark)

Panel questions Peabody ownership
By Stephanie Rogers
Yale Daily News
A recent campus debate about two carvings at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History has sparked a broader discussion about the role of museums to return culturally important objects. At a panel discussion in the Yale Hall of Graduate Studies last Tuesday afternoon, panelist Ashley Dalton '15 outlined the history of these objects and called upon museums like the Peabody to publicly address the historical trauma with which they are associated while still emphasizing native continuity and agency. Dalton and Peabody officials agree that the museum has no current legal obligation to return the objects. However, other speakers from University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Smithsonian who presented on other topics related to artifact repatriation — the act of returning a cultural object home — argued that the museum should still be even more proactive to obtain formal written requests to return objects that are sacred to native groups...(more)

A bridge between generations: Cyril George remembered
He was 'one of the master storytellers of our time'
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Noted Tlingit elder Cyril George Sr., leader of the Deisheetaan (Raven/Beaver) clan from Khaakáak'w Hít (Basket Bay Arch House) of Angoon, died April 15 in Anchorage at age 92. George, former mayor of Angoon, had lived in Juneau since 1975. George was remembered this past week for his gifts as an orator, storyteller and culture bearer, as well as for his role as a bridge between generations. Right up until the last months of his life, he regularly visited Tlingit language classrooms at the University of Alaska Southeast, documented Tlingit history and language through video recordings, and forged strong bonds with young people, including his 84 grandchildren, telling them clan stories over and over so they wouldn't be forgotten...(more)

Alaska becomes the second state to officially recognize indigenous languages
By Casey Kelly
KTOO-FM
Supporters of a bill to make 20 Alaska Native languages official state languages organized a 15 hour sit-in protest at the Capitol on Sunday. Their dedication paid off early this morning, when the measure passed the Alaska Senate on an 18-2 vote. House Bill 216 passed the Alaska House of Representatives last week, 38-0. It now heads to Governor Sean Parnell for his signature. Dozens of people of all ages and races, many wearing their Easter finest, gathered in the hall outside Sen. Lesil McGuire's office. The Anchorage Republican and chair of the Senate Rules Committee had the power to put House Bill 216 on the Senate's calendar. But with end of the legislative session looming, the bill's supporters worried it was getting caught up in last-minute, behind-the-scenes politics...(more)

Tribe seeks return of artifacts taken from abandoned Alaska village
By Alex DeMarban
ALASKA DISPATCH
A prominent Southeast Alaska cultural leader says that Yale University's museum that has held onto a pair of Tlingit carvings taken from an abandoned village more than a century ago should voluntarily return the items instead of waiting for tribal officials to make a formal request. Courtesy Yale University
An East Coast museum that houses a pair of Tlingit carvings taken from an abandoned village more than a century ago should voluntarily return the items instead of waiting for tribal officials to make a formal request, said a prominent cultural leader from Southeast Alaska. At issue are a pair of large wooden crests on display at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University...(more)

Lecture on herring now online
If you missed our lecture on herring by Dr. Madonna Moss, you can now watch it online. Moss, a professor of anthropology at the University of Oregon, has studied herring bones at 16 archaeological sites in Southeast Alaska that date back 10,000 years. In her talk, she reveals some of her findings so far. Her work is important because current data on past herring runs and human reliance on them dates only to the mid 1900s, so her research gives a clearer historical picture. The study may be an invaluable tool to improve resource management of herring fisheries, which are considered by many to be a depleted resource here. (Video) (Video Library)

Call for apprentices: Gajaa Hít totem pole and house screen
Deadline to apply is April 24
SHI and the Tlingit Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) are recruiting for three apprentice positions. Apprentices will work with Native carvers, Joe Young and TJ Young on the completion of the Gajaa Hít Project in Juneau. Two apprentice carvers will work on an Eagle totem pole and one apprentice carver will work on a house screen, both in the traditional Northwest Coast art style. Carving will take place at Gajaa Hít and on the Sealaska Plaza terrace in downtown Juneau. Apprentices will earn $5,000 to $10,000...(more) (Call For Apprentices)

SHI seeking teachers, artists for Jinéit Art Academy
Teams to create formline teaching kits for schools
SHI is seeking K-12 teachers and Native artists from seven communities to participate in the institute's Jinéit Art Academy in Juneau. The teachers and artists will collaborate during the academy to create kits, which will be used to teach formline design, a term that describes the intricate shapes found in the distinctive Northwest Coast art. The academy is scheduled June 2-6 in Juneau and is open to applicants in Angoon, Yakutat, Craig, Haines, Hydaburg, Ketchikan and Sitka. SHI's Jinéit Art Academy will pay for travel and lodging...(more) (Flyer) (Teacher Application) (Artist Application)

Be a volunteer for Celebration 2014!
SHI relies on volunteers to make Celebration happen. We could not do it without them. We need 200 volunteers--people who donate a minimum of four hours get a free, one-day pass. To volunteer, submit an application to Volunteer Coordinator: Mike Hoyt, 907.586.9166, michael.hoyt@sealaska.com. (Application)

SHI to sponsor Latseen Leadership Academy
Institute accepting applicatinos through May 16
Applications are now available for Sealaska Heritage Institute's annual Latseen Leadership Academy program. SHI for the first time will offer the program in two Southeast Alaska villages. This year's academies for high school students will be held July 6-19 on Prince of Wales Island and July 19-31 in Angoon. Travel scholarships are available for students living outside of those areas. Students will be placed at one of the camps according to their proximity to the camp locations...(more)

SHI to sponsor lecture on new research on ancient herring populations
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute will sponsor a lecture in April to unveil intriguing research on ancient herring populations in Alaska and Native people's long-term reliance on the resource. Lecturer Dr. Madonna Moss, professor of anthropology at University of Oregon, has studied herring bones at 16 archaeological sites in Southeast Alaska that date back 10,000 years. In her talk, she'll reveal some of her findings so far...(more)

SHI to sponsor lecture on new research on ancient herring populations
SHI will sponsor a lecture in April to unveil intriguing research on ancient herring populations in Alaska and Native people's long-term reliance on the resource. Lecturer Dr. Madonna Moss, professor of anthropology at University of Oregon, has studied herring bones at 16 archaeological sites in Southeast Alaska that date back 10,000 years. In her talk, she'll reveal some of her findings so far. Her work is important because current data on past herring runs and human reliance on them dates only to the mid 1900s, so her research will give a much clearer historical picture, said Dr. Chuck Smythe...(more) (Flyer)

Apply for the 2014 Math and Culture Academy!
SHI is currently accepting applications for our 2014 Math and Culture Academy. This academy will bring together 50 middle school students from Angoon, Hoonah, Klukwan, Hydaburg and Juneau for 10 days to enhance their math skills through traditional cultural ways of knowing. The academy will be held at the University of Alaska Southeast from June 20 to July 1, 2014. Travel, food, and accommodations will be provided at no cost to the participants. All students will stay on campus with chaperones. If a school district employee or parent is interested in being a chaperone please let us know. Please share information with your middle schools students about the Summer Math and Culture Academy. To register for the academy students need to submit an application packet by April 30, 2014. Packets can be emailed, mailed or faxed to Rachael DeMarce, rachael.demarce@sealaska.com; fax: 907.586.9293; mail: One Sealaska Plaza, Suite 301, Juneau, AK 99801. (Flyer) (Registration Packet)

Language nights ignite passion for Tlingit culture
GREEN & GOLD NEWS
University of Alaska Anchorage
As a child, Nae Brown's grandfather journeyed from Alaska to attend the Chemawa Indian School—sharing the fate of thousands of Alaska Native children sent away to live in boarding schools that, too often, severely punished them for speaking their own languages or practicing their own customs. When Nae's grandfather returned, years later, he no longer spoke the Tlingit tongue. “It seemed like a big void,” said Nae, an Alaska Native Studies student at the University of Alaska Southeast. “You can't have culture without language or language without culture. It's a connection to our ancestors"...(more)

Alaska artists create art from cultural traditions
NEWSMINER
By Theresa Bakker
Two pieces of artwork recently arrived at the University of Alaska Museum of the North from the same auction in Juneau — a blown glass sculpture called “Copper Totem” and “Sitka Petroglyph,” a beaded collar made of felted wool. Both pieces were purchased in early February at an event sponsored by the Sealaska Heritage Institute in Southeast Alaska. One of the objects will be catalogued and included in the museum's ethnology collection. The other will become part of the collected works in the museum's fine arts department...(more)

Perpetuating culture, restoring language: Tlingit and the Sealaska Heritage Institute
Rising Voices
“We don't want what you did here to only echo in the air, how our grandfathers used to do things… Yes. You have unwrapped it for us. That is why we will open again this container of wisdom left in our care.” This quote by George Davis (Kichnáalx—Lk'aanaaw) of Angoon led the opening Sealaska Heritage Institute conference in 1980. The organisation exists to “perpetuate the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian cultures,” with a more recent primary focus on language restoration...(more)

SHI seeking art director
SHI is seeking an art director to develop and manage the Art Department with guidance from the president and chief of operations on the goals, vision and strategic plan to expand Alaska Native arts in the community and region. Projects may be developed in response to specific issues of public interest related to the sustainability of traditional cultural practices in the Native communities of Southeast Alaska. Minimum qualifications: bachelor's degree and two years of program management and grant administration.  (Job Description)

Travel discount for Celebration available
Alaska Airlines is offering a 5 percent discount for people traveling to and from Celebration 2014. Departure cities include any Alaska Airlines/Horizon Air US or Canadian city. (Not Included:  Prudhoe Bay, Hawaii & Mexico). Beginning Travel Date: June 8, 2014; Last Travel Date: June 17, 2014. Discount Code: ECMV344.

SHI extends deadline for juried art competition
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute has extended the application deadline for the 2014 Juried Art Competition and Show to April 7. Artists may submit up to three pieces for review. Jurors select artwork based on high quality and integrity of Northwest Coast art in three categories: customary, customary-inspired, and 2D formline design. Selected artwork will be on display during Celebration (June 11-14) and eligible for prizes. SHI will make the following awards for best of show and in three categories...(more)

SHI to sponsor Native Artist Market
JUNEAU EMPIRE
SHI will sponsor a Native Artist Market in June during Celebration 2014. Native artists should apply now for a table at the market, which will be held June 12-14 at Sealaska Plaza in downtown Juneau. To apply for a table, contact Shaadoo'tlaa at 586-9129 or shaa@sealaska.com. Space is limited to forty tables...(more)

SHI extends deadline for Juried Art Show and Competition
SHI has extended the application deadline for the 2014 Juried Art Competition and Show to April 7, 2014. Artists may submit up to 3 pieces for review. Jurors select artwork based on high quality and integrity of Northwest Coast art in three categories: customary, customary-inspired, and 2D formline design. Selected artwork will be on display during Celebration (June 11-14) and eligible for prizes. SHI will make the following awards for best of show and in three categories...(more)

Applications available for Toddler Regalia Review
SHI will sponsor a Toddler Regalia Review during Celebration 2014. This popular event is open to Sealaska shareholders and shareholder descendants who are ages two to four years and who are dressed in traditional regalia. Deadline to submit an application is May 9. For more information, contact Stephanie Moreno-Beckner, 907.586.9220, stephanie.moreno-beckner@sealaska.com. (Application)



SHI to sponsor Native Artist Market
Tables available for reservation now
SHI will sponsor a Native Artist Market in June during Celebration 2014. Native artists should apply now for a table at the market, which will be held June 12-14 at Sealaska Plaza in downtown Juneau. To reserve a table, submit an application to Shaadoo'tlaa at 586-9129 or shaa@sealaska.com. Space is limited to forty tables.
..(more) (Application) (Flyer)


Photo of Git Hoan Dancers by Brian WallaceThank you to the Sealaska Proxy Donors!
SHI expresses its deepest gratitude to the individuals who donated their 2013 $25 proxy funds, or voting incentives, to SHI. Sealaska contributes funds to support the administrative cost of SHI, but we must raise the additional funds from donations and grants from the public and private sector to support our cultural, language and educational programs. The 2013 contributions will help us build the Walter Soboleff Center. Thank you to everyone on this list for your continued support!

What a difference a sewing machine makes! (VIDEO)
Jeremiah James of Yakutat knows how to sew skins by hand. But he was amazed to learn how much faster he became after learning to use a skin-sewing machine through SHI's Sustainable Art Program. Watch this short video to hear about his experience! SHI began the Sustainable Arts Program to reintroduce the ancient art of skin sewing throughout Southeast Alaska. The goals are to save a nearly lost art form, develop a cottage industry in rural communities and more fully utilize a sustainable resource…(more) (Video) (Workshops)

Learn about math through Native art!
SHI will bring together about 25 students from Angoon, Hoonah, Klukwan, Hydaburg and Juneau for 3 days to enhance their math skills through traditional cultural ways of knowing. The academy will be held in Juneau at Gaaja Hít, located at 250 Village Street. Students will be learning about the math involved in the construction of totem poles from TJ and Joe Young, brothers who are carving the totem poles and screen for the Gaaja Hít building. Students will also participate in additional activities, including rock climbing and ice skating. The Mid-Winter Math and Culture Academy is scheduled from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm, Tuesday, March 18 through Thursday, March 20, 2014, during spring break. The Math and Culture Academy along with breakfast snacks, lunch, and activities will be provided at no cost to the students. To register for the academy students need to submit a registration packet by March 10, 2014. Packets can be emailed, mailed or faxed to Rachael DeMarce, rachael.demarce@sealaska.com; fax: 907.586.9293; mail: One Sealaska Plaza, Suite 301, Juneau, AK 99801. (Registration Packet) (Flyer)

SHI accepting applications for juried art competition
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute is accepting applications for its seventh biennial Juried Art Show and Competition during Celebration 2014, scheduled June 11-14 in Juneau. SHI has added a new category this year: 2D formline design, meaning formline on a flat surface such as a print of formline...(more)

Live stream-ing UAS program brings Southeast's outdoors into the classroom
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
What are the physics of a Tlingit canoe? What is the chemistry of smoking fish? If you're teaching science, technology, reading, engineering, art and math, why not teach them through a lens of place and culture? The STREAM institute, whose name comes from the initials of the subjects it teaches, is an initiative by the University of Alaska Southeast and partners. Its aim is to create school lessons specific to Southeast Alaska...(more)

SHI accepting applications for juried art competition
New category for 2D formline design added
SHI is accepting applications for its seventh, biennial Juried Art Show and Competition during Celebration 2014, scheduled June 11-14 in Juneau. SHI has added a new category this year: 2D formline design, meaning formline on a flat surface such as a print of formline. Artists also will compete in two other categories: Northwest Coast customary, and Northwest Coast inspired customary (formerly known as traditional and contemporary respectively in past competitions)...(more) (Guidelines) (Application) (Flyer)

Thank you for making SHI's Tináa Art Auction a success
Capital City Weekly
Thank you community of Juneau and the people who attended for making SHI's Tináa Art Auction a success. Thank you to the people who sponsored the event, bought tickets, made donations at the event, and purchased art and other items up for auction. Because of you, we raised more than $300,000 for the construction of the Walter Soboleff Center. Great thanks to the following who made the auction successful...(more)

SHI seeking apprentice carvers
SHI is recruiting apprentice carvers to work on a totem pole and house screen. The apprentices will work with Joe and TJ Young to carve a pole and paint a screen for Gajaa Hít in Juneau. To apply, submit a complete application to Rico Worl at One Sealaska Plaza, Suite 301, Juneau, AK  99801. (Application)

Walter Soboleff Center under constructionPaul G. Allen Family Foundation gives grant to fund Walter Soboleff Center
The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation has given a large grant to Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) to help fund construction of the Walter Soboleff Center in Juneau. The $200,000 grant to SHI was one of 53 grants given by the foundation to support arts and culture, education, financial literacy and organizational support for nonprofit groups. It's the first time SHI has received a grant from this major foundation, which is based in Seattle, said SHI President Rosita Worl. “It brings us closer to reaching our goal of $20 million, and we are just so grateful to the foundation for this donation of $200,000,” Worl said. (Press Release)

Place-based fashion
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
2014 is already shaping up to be a stimulating year for Juneau residents interested in fashion design — particularly in terms of fashion that carries a strong sense of place...The concept of drawing on the natural world and on cultural history to inform clothing design was also prominently featured in a fashion show this past weekend as part of Sealaska Heritage Institute's Tináa Art Auction. But in this case, the natural world was represented not only in imagery, but in the materials the artists used to create their pieces. The artists' links to their cultural history and identity were much more explicit in this venue, collectively reflecting a pride in Alaska's indigenous cultures...(more)

Tináa Art Auction a big success
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
The artwork on view at Saturday night's Tináa Art Auction at Centennial Hall highlighted the vibrancy and range of what's been happening recently in the world of Northwest Coast art, while paving the way for a project that will help carry that energy forward into the future. Tináa, Sealaska Heritage Institute's first-ever art auction, drew a sold-out, black-tie crowd of more than 300 people, who collectively raised more than $300,000 for the Walter Soboleff Center, currently under construction on Front Street downtown. The building, named for a highly influential Tlingit elder and spiritual leader who died in 2011 at age 102, will house an array of art programs, as well as performance and exhibit spaces and a retail shop...(more) (Slideshow)

SHI's first art auction to open Saturday
SHI's Tinaa Art Auction will open Saturday, Feb. 1 and feature a silent auction, a live auction, dinner and a high fashion show. Event sponsors are invited to a sneak peek preview reception with the artists at 6 pm, Friday, Jan. 31 at Centennial Hall. We still have a few tickets left. We are blown away by the volume and caliber of Northwest Coast pieces donated to us by the artists. Proceeds will go toward the Walter Soboleff Center project. (Program) (News Article)

Empire Editorial: The power of language
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Language influences much of our everyday lives, from the depth of how we express ourselves to the way in which we view the world. For thousands and thousands of Alaska Natives, their language was taken from them and replaced with English decades ago. When a language becomes nearly extinct, the cultural tie that links a group of people to their heritage is weakened. A new program by the Sealaska Heritage Institute is making strides to strengthen that bond by revitalizing the Tlingit language, which today is only spoken by about 200 people, according to SHI's Rosita Worl...(more)

SHI begins 3-year Tlingit language mentor/apprentice pairing
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Tlingit elders and language learners gathered at the Sealaska Heritage Institute at the end of January to begin a project that's been long in the making: Tlingit language mentor and apprentice pairings.
Formally called "Bridging Challenges to Fluency through Partnerships: A Tlingit Mentor-Apprentice Language Program," the project pairs elders and apprentices from Yakutat, Sitka and Juneau for a three-year language learning project."I'm excited to hear our language alive," said SHI Director Rosita Worl in opening comments for the orientation and training workshop. "Every time we lose a speaker, it hurts us all, but we should also be celebrating that as each day goes by, our language becomes stronger."...(more)

A day in the life of: Ka Seix Selina Everson
By Mary Catharine Martin
Capital City Weekly
Ka Seix Selina Everson was thirteen in the early 1940s, when she first went to Sheldon Jackson College, then a boarding school for Native children. She was born in Angoon, and grew up hearing her elders, her parents and her grandmothers speak Tlingit. Her grandmothers and her mother spoke only Tlingit. So it was a shock to arrive in Sitka and find the use of her language discouraged, even forbidden. But it's a shock she doesn't remember - it was just too painful."I wiped it out of my mind," she said. Her brothers, forbidden from speaking Tlingit on the campus "ground," would jump up in the air to speak to each other"...(more)

2012 Juried Art Show. Photo by Brian Wallace.Call for artists!
The application is now available for SHI's biennial Juried Art Show and Competition. Artists will compete for top prizes at the competition, which will be held during Celebration 2014. A Juried Art Show is a competitive exhibition where artists submit work to be reviewed by a panel of qualified jurors. Jurors select artwork based on high quality and integrity of Northwest Coast art formline and design. Selected artwork will be on display in the show during Celebration and eligible for prizes. We are looking forward to another incredible show of Northwest Coast art! (Guidelines) (Application)

New program pairs elders, students in hope of restoring Tlingit language
By Laurel Andrews
ALASKA DISPATCH
A three-year language mentorship program beginning in Southeast Alaska in August hopes to help revitalize the Tlingit language, classified as on the edge of extinction, by pairing fluent elders with advanced learners of the language. On Tuesday, Sealaska Heritage Institute announced the six apprentice-mentor teams that will spend the next three years working together. Apprentices will be paired with elders in the communities of Sitka, Yakutat and Juneau, working toward fluency in the language...(more)

A day in the life: Joshua Jackson, kindergarten teacher, constant learner
By Mary Catharine Martin
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
Harborview kindergarten teacher Joshua Jackson makes managing a classroom of 20 five-year-olds look easy. On a recent day, the words on the board for "Walk to Read," the name of a Juneau elementary school program that gathers students at a similar reading level from several different kindergarten classes, were "big," "bin," "a" and "is." Led by "Mr. Josh," the students spent time rearranging letters to form words, and words to form a sentence: "A bin is big." Then they tried it on their own - a scene with kindergartener-friendly scissors, glue sticks, paper and lots of individual attention...(more)

Photo: Canoe give me a hand?
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Donald Gregory, left, and Zachary Jones of the Sealaska Heritage Institute, unwrap a 14.5 foot long interwaterway canoe on Thursday carved by Tlingit artist Fred Bemis of Yakutat. The canoe will be up for sale at next weekend's Tináa Art Auction held by SHI at Centennial Hall to help fund the new Walter Soboleff Center. Wings of Alaska donated a flight on Thursday to fly the canoe to Juneau...(more)

SHI chooses mentor-apprentice teams to revitalize Tlingit language
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute has chosen six teams of Tlingit speakers and students who will hone their skills over the next three years in an effort to revitalize the Tlingit language. SHI chose mentor-apprentice teams in Sitka, Yakutat and Juneau and will train them on mentor-apprentice language methods and strategies later this month. The institute made Native language revitalization a priority in the 1990s and has cultivated a number of students, but it's time to intensify that effort, said SHI President Rosita Worl...(more)

SHI chooses mentor-apprentice teams to revitalize Tlingit language
Institute to train teams in Juneau this week
SHI has chosen six teams of Tlingit speakers and students who will hone their skills over the next three years in an effort to revitalize the Tlingit language. SHI chose mentor-apprentice teams in Sitka, Yakutat and Juneau and will train them on mentor-apprentice language methods and strategies later this month. The institute made Native language revitalization a priority in the 1990s and has cultivated a number of students, but it's time to intensify that effort, said SHI President Rosita Worl. “We're very fortunate in that we have many language learners. We have many, but we need more...(more)

Empire Editorial: Nov. 14 should be known as Walter Soboleff Day
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Nov. 14 could become known in Alaska as Walter Soboleff Day. We hope that it is. Lawmakers on both sides introduced legislation last week that would further cement the late Native elder's place in history by commemorating the day he was born. It was on Nov. 14, 1908, that we were given Walter Soboleff, and from that day forth Alaska has been better off thanks to the roles he played, big and small...(more) (Walter Soboleff Center)

A long way from home
Tlingit helmet's arrival in Springfield may remain a mystery
By Matthew Timothy Bradley
FOR THE JUNEAU EMPIRE
After surviving a 1792 attack by a Tlingit war party in Prince William Sound, future Governor of Russian Alaska Alexander Baranov described the Tlingit warriors as wearing “thick helmets with figures of monsters on them.” While the figures on the helmets must have been terrifying indeed to Baranov, they were anything but monstrous to the wearers. They were their clan crests, vital elements of Tlingit social and personal identity. A Russian account of the 1802 raid on Saint Michael also mentions Tlingit war helmets, and documentation of the 1804 Battle of Sitka describes Chief K'alyáan's Raven helmet, which now resides at the Sheldon Jackson Museum near the site of the battle...(more)

Soboleff Center construction coming along
Construction of cultural center's infrastructure nearly complete
By Emily Russo Miller
JUNEAU EMPIRE
First came the excavation, then the groundwork. Now, the infrastructure is nearly complete. Construction crews are almost done building the steel framework that will support the Walter Soboleff Cultural Center, Sealaska Heritage Institute's new cultural center being built on the corner of Seward and Front Streets in downtown Juneau. The towering three-story “steel skeleton”, as the project manager put it, rose quickly. “I have friends that said, ‘I hadn't been downtown in two weeks and now there's a building there',” Lee Kadinger, Sealaska's chief operating officer and the project manager, said as he chuckled during in an interview Wednesday...(more)

SHI's Tináa auction brings together works by major Northwest Coast artists
By Amy Fletcher
JUNEAU EMPIRE
A major art auction will take place in Juneau in a couple weeks, bringing together work from some of the biggest names in Northwest Coast art. Organized by Sealaska Heritage Institute as a fundraiser for the Walter Soboleff Center, currently under construction on Front Street, the Tináa Art Auction is an early manifestation of what SHI hopes to achieve through the Soboleff Center — establish Juneau as a center of Northwest Coast art in the region, and celebrate the vitality of the genre as a whole...(more)

Stedman says hydro funds tight, otter bill will change
By Ed Schoenfeld
CoastAlaska News
...(Sitka Sen. Bert) Stedman last year proposed a bounty on sea otters, which eat shellfish Southeast divers and crabbers harvest. His bill brought strong criticism from environmental groups. And the federal agency managing otters said it would violate marine-mammal-protection law. The legislation is still in play. Stedman says he wants to find a different way to support Native hunters, the only people allowed to harvest otters and process their pelts. “I need to sit down with the Sealaska Heritage (Institute)...(more)

SHI to sponsor skin-sewing workshops in five communities
Program headed to Anchorage for first time
Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) will sponsor skin-sewing workshops in five communities in an effort to revitalize a traditional art form and to create a cottage industry in Southeast Alaska. Through the program, called the Southeast Alaska Sustainable Arts Project, students in Angoon, Ketchikan, Haines, Anchorage and Petersburg will learn to stretch hides, cut patterns and hand-sew hats and scarves from furs. The first class is scheduled this month in Angoon, and after receiving numerous requests from people in Anchorage, SHI for the first time will sponsor a skin-sewing workshop there. Almost 2,000 Sealaska shareholders live in Anchorage and the surrounding area...(more) (Application) (Flyer) (Workshops by Community)

Bill would create Walter Soboleff Day
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Bi-partisan legislation introduced Jan. 10 would designate Nov. 14 as Walter Soboleff Day, honoring the life of the Tlingit elder who died in 2011 at age 102. Rep. Cathy Muñoz, R-Juneau, Rep. Beth Kerttula, D-Juneau, Rep. Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins, D-Sitka, and Rep. Peggy Wilson, R-Wrangell, are co-prime sponsors of the legislation, according to a news release from the House Democratic Caucus. Soboleff was a member of the Raven moeity and Dog Salmon clan, and was a translator and scholar of Tlingit language and storytelling...The Sealaska Heritage Institute is building a multi-million-dollar arts center named for Soboleff in downtown Juneau...(more)

Emergence of rare Tlingit war helmet raises a chorus for homecoming
By Laurel Andrews
ALASKA DISPATCH
Tribal leaders are hoping a rare Tlingit war helmet that sat mislabeled in museum archives in western Massachusetts for more than 100 years will be returned to Southeast Alaska now that the artifact, considered a sacred object, has been brought to light. The helmet, uncovered this autumn in the Springfield Science Museum archives, was put on display in late December. Records show that the object was accepted into the museum's collections around the turn of the 20th century, spokesperson Matt Longhi said. The helmet was logged into museum archives simply, and incorrectly, as “Aleutian hat"...(more)

Opportunity for organizations with archives
SHI's archivist, Zach Jones, is participating in a state program to offer consulting services to organizations with archives. Applicants can request that the Alaska State Historical Records Advisory Board (ASHRAB) send a professional archivist to their community to give two to three days of hands-on service. This includes help processing collections, training staff, preserving collections, helping with policy development, and offering a planning and preservation survey. No charge. SHI is hoping to serve Southeast Alaska tribal organizations. ...(more)

Faces of Alaska: Rosita Worl
By Alexandra Gutierrez
Alaska Public Media
Throughout her life, Dr. Rosita Worl has been a fighter, an anthropologist and an activist. She's made it her life's goal to preserve Southeast Alaska Native traditions while building a collective future for Native people throughout the state. Her early life was full of drama. She's been kidnapped, she has fled from an arranged marriage and she fought her way through high school. But Dr. Worl persevered through these hardships and those early memories have remained an important part of her history. I sat down with Rosita at her home in Juneau to talk about her progression from being a young child to her current role as president of the Sealaska Heritage Institute...(more)

Scholarships offered to Sealaska shareholders
By Ed Schoenfeld
CoastAlaska News
The Sealaska Heritage Institute is once again offering scholarships to students attending college, graduate school or vocational-technical programs. Only Sealaska shareholders and their lineal descendents are eligible. Institute President Rosita Worl says up to 400 scholarships are awarded each year. “A major consideration is the hopes that our educated young people will come back home and help us in developing strong, healthy communities,” Worl says. The application deadline is March 1st. Students submitting paperwork by February 1st get an extra $50 tacked onto their scholarships, if they qualify...(more)

Southeast Alaska Native art heritage celebrated statewide
By Garrett Turner
KTUU-TV
Last weekend, the Sealaska Heritage Institute offered a chance to pass down a tradition from generation to generation, in a formline design workshop at the Alaska Native Heritage Center in Anchorage. Formline is a term that describes the complex designs that make up the distinctive Northwest Coast art practiced by the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian clans. Formline design expert Steve Brown says this cultural art is important to the heritage of many Alaska Natives. "In trying to learn this historical background and the established tradition of this art form, it means they can carry it on from one generation to another -- the same way it came down over the last thousand or two years," Brown said...(more)

Worl profile to air tonight
Alaska public television will air a profile on SHI President Rosita Worl tonight (Jan. 6) as part of their Faces of Alaska series. From the promotional copy: “Her early life was full of drama; She has been kidnapped, fled from an arranged marriage, and fought her way through high school….” It'll air from 8-8:30. (Promo video).  

Sneak peek at art for auction
Volunteers needed!
We just posted a sneak-peek catalog showing some of the masterpieces donated to SHI for the Tináa Art Auction in Juneau. Tickets and sponsorships are available now. If you won't be in Juneau but want to participate, contact us about absentee bidding. We also need volunteers! Contact Mike Hoyt, michael.hoyt@sealaska.com, 907.586.9166 to volunteer. (Sneak-Peek Catalog) (Absentee Bidding) (Tickets) (Sponsorships) (Volunteer Application)

SHI accepting applications for college, voc-tech scholarships
Institute offering cash incentive to early birds
SHI is accepting scholarship applications for the 2014-2015 school year. The deadline to apply is March 1, 2014. However, the institute is offering a $50 incentive to those who complete their scholarship application on or before Feb. 1 and who are accepted as scholarship recipients; if selected as a recipient, the $50 will be included in their scholarship award. Scholarships must be filled out and submitted online. Awards will be made to Sealaska shareholders and descendants enrolled in accredited colleges, universities and voc-tech schools. The scholarships are given to roughly 400 students per year...(more) (Apply)

Gold Medal Tournament to include women's teams
"B" and "M" brackets lose two teams, "C" gains two
By Klas Stolpe
JUNEAU EMPIRE
For the first time in six years a woman's bracket will be included into the Juneau Lions Club Gold Medal Basketball Tournament. According to a press release from JLC president Edward Hotch a committee of club members reviewed an October proposal from Sealaska Heritage Institute's Carmaleeda Estrada to include women's teams, voted unanimously in November to add the women's bracket again and began this week notifying all bracket teams selected to the tournament...(more)

Worl responds to finding of Tlingit helmet, erroneous information
“This hat is Tlingit clan at.óowu--an object that was owned by a clan and holds the Spirit of the Eagle. It embodies the spirits of our ancestors who used the hat. From other events we've experienced, I will say that its emergence signifies that the ancestral spirits want and need to come home. Under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, it is an 'object of cultural patrimony' and a 'sacred object,' and subject to repatriation. I would trust the Springfield Museum will understand that the sacred value of this hat lies in its return to its home. In one of the articles I read about the helmet, it said that women were not allowed to touch military armor. I'm not certain where this came from, but women had significant power in traditional Southeast Alaska Native societies. Wealth flowed through the maternal line, and women approved of major economic transactions. The historical records are replete with accounts of women voiding trading transactions and goods. If they did not approve, the trade was negated. They were great orators and warriors as well although they served as clan leaders only in the absence of eligible males. The subservience of women came with Western society, and Native women moved from a state of equality to inequality. Unfortunately, today we have those who erroneously advance the notion that the subservience of women is ‘traditional'. Let us debunk this myth.” (Original Story) (Alaska Dispatch)

SHI to sponsor workshop on formline in Anchorage
Workshop result of demand from Anchorage shareholders
SHI will sponsor a formline workshop in Anchorage next month at the request of Sealaska shareholders. The grant from the Alaska State Council on the Arts will help fund a two-day class taught by formline-design expert Steve Brown. Formline design is a term that describes the complex designs, such as ovoids and split Us, that are the underlying components of the distinctive Northwest Coast art practiced by the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian. The workshop is scheduled Jan. 4-5 at the Alaska Native Heritage Center, which is partnering with SHI for the class. The Saturday class will run from 10 am to 5 pm and the Sunday class will run from 8 am to 3 pm. The workshop will be free of charge and accommodate up to thirty students. People who want to enroll should contact Becky Etukeok at 907.330.8000 or BEtukeok@alaskanative.net...(more)
(Flyer)

Native artists commit works for Sealaska auction
JUNEAU EMPIRE
Sealaska Heritage Institute officials say more than 40 northwest Native artists have committed works for an auction fundraiser scheduled to take place next year in Juneau. The Tinaa (Tin-AH') Art Auction is scheduled for Feb. 1 and will feature a live auction, silent auction and a Native fashion show. The pieces committed by artists for the auction range in value between $500 and $55,000. Works include weavings, jewelry, paintings, and wood and glass carvings...(more)

Group nominates SHI for "Project for Awesome 2013"
Grant Writers LLC has chosen SHI for this year's Project for Awesome. The group made a video about SHI's programs. If people "like" the video on YouTube by 8pm (AKST) Wednesday, Dec. 18, a portion of worldwide funds raised through the program will be donated to help build the Walter Soboleff Center! Click this link, click "like" and leave the comment "DFTBA" to vote (stands for Don't Forget to be Awesome). The more votes we get the more we raise. Thanks Grant Writers LLC, we are honored!

David Boxley works on a bentwood box he is donating to the auction.SHI's first art auction attracts huge names in Northwest Coast art
Tickets, table sponsorships now available for event
Native artists who have committed pieces to SHI's first-ever Native art auction rank among the top Northwest Coast artists in the world. The list of donors who have committed work to the Tináa Art Auction—which will raise funds to build the Walter Soboleff Center in Juneau—reads like a Who's Who of Northwest Coast artists, said SHI President Rosita Worl. Some of the artists are so well known, their pieces sell for tens of thousands of dollars, and the auction will be a chance for collectors to own work by artists they might otherwise not be able to buy. “Here you have a chance of maybe bidding and getting a Preston Singletary glass piece, a Robert Davidson painting, a Nathan Jackson carving. Those people who are interested in Northwest Coast art will want to attend this event...(more)

Sealaska Heritage Institute plans art auction fundraiser for Soboleff Center
By Casey Kelly
KTOO-FM
Construction workers this week began erecting the steel frame for Sealaska Heritage Institute's Walter Soboleff Center in downtown Juneau. The 29,000 square foot facility is scheduled for completion in January 2015. SHI has raised about $17.5 million of the $20 million project cost. The nonprofit is planning a major fundraiser early next year to get closer to the overall goal. Project manager and Sealaska Heritage Institute Chief Operating Officer Lee Kadinger says construction is moving quickly...(more)

SHI seeking proposals for exterior panels on Walter Soboleff Center
SHI is seeking proposals from Sealaska tribal member shareholders or descendants to create designs that reflect the Southeast Alaska Native four core cultural values. The designs will be featured on panels on the exterior of the Walter Soboleff Center. The designs as envisioned by the artist should be created in color and adhere to the classic Northwest Coast art formline. The designs will be depicted on two separate panels. The overall dimensions of each panel of the two panels is 39 feet and 6 inches high and 14 feet wide. The design should be created to ensure that each element of the formline design does not exceed sizes greater than 5 feet by 12 feet within the overall dimension each panel...(more) (RFP) (Photos)

Feds finalize otter use guidelines
By Matt Lichtenstein
KFSK-FM
The federal government has finalized new guidelines on the use of sea otters by Alaska Natives. The change is aimed at better-defining a requirement that hides must be “significantly altered” in order to be considered authentic native handicrafts or clothing that can be sold to non-natives...t's a positive step, according to the Sealaska Heritage Institute which teaches classes in the native tradition of skin sewing. SHI Chief Operating Officer Lee Kadinger says the new wording still needs some adjustment but, overall, he says SHI appreciates the change...(more)

Boraas lecture on spirituality and the sacred now online
Alan Boraas' lecture on spirituality and the sacred is now available through our online video library. In his talk, The Great Blessing of the Water: Salmon and Indigenized Orthodoxy on the Nushagak River, he discusses the Nushagak Yup'ik, saying they are among the last of the world's salmon cultures and spirituality is fundamental to their being. One of the enduring ceremonies of the Yup'ik villages of the Nushagak River is the Great Blessing of the Water. He describes his observations of this remarkable ceremony during his visit in 2011 and relates it to the people's fight to maintain a modern subsistence lifestyle in the face of proposed industrial mining. (Video)

SHI seeking proposals for house screen, posts
SHI is seeking proposals from Sealaska tribal member shareholders or descendants to design and create a clan house screen and two house posts for installation in the Walter Soboleff Center's performance area. The two house post designs will depict warriors in their traditional armor. The house posts should measure 10 feet high and carved in yellow cedar. The house posts should be carved on the Sealaska Plaza during the summer of 2014. The cedar logs will be provided by SHI. The screen design should reflect a traditional Chilkat Robe. The design should be a generic design used by all Southeast Alaska Natives and not a crest owned by a clan. The screen should measure 10 feet high and 17 feet wide and should be made from glass. The project must be completed by September 15, 2014...(more) (RFP) (Photos)

 



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